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Trust, AI, and Synthetic Biometrics

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posted on 2024-05-13, 22:04 authored by Patrick G Tinsley
Artificial Intelligence-based image generation has recently seen remarkable advancements, largely driven by deep learning techniques, such as Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs). With the influx and development of generative models, so too have biometric re-identification models and presentation attack detection models seen a surge in discriminative performance. However, despite the impressive photo-realism of generated samples and the additive value to the data augmentation pipeline, the role and usage of machine learning models has received intense scrutiny and criticism, especially in the context of biometrics, often being labeled as untrustworthy. Problems that have garnered attention in modern machine learning include: humans' and machines' shared inability to verify the authenticity of (biometric) data, the inadvertent leaking of private biometric data through the image synthesis process, and racial bias in facial recognition algorithms. Given the arrival of these unwanted side effects, public trust has been shaken in the blind use and ubiquity of machine learning. However, in tandem with the advancement of generative AI, there are research efforts to re-establish trust in generative and discriminative machine learning models. Explainability methods based on aggregate model salience maps can elucidate the inner workings of a detection model, establishing trust in a post hoc manner. The CYBORG training strategy, originally proposed by Boyd, attempts to actively build trust into discriminative models by incorporating human salience into the training process. In doing so, CYBORG-trained machine learning models behave more similar to human annotators and generalize well to unseen types of synthetic data. Work in this dissertation also attempts to renew trust in generative models by training generative models on synthetic data in order to avoid identity leakage in models trained on authentic data. In this way, the privacy of individuals whose biometric data was seen during training is not compromised through the image synthesis procedure. Future development of privacy-aware image generation techniques will hopefully achieve the same degree of biometric utility in generative models with added guarantees of trustworthiness.

History

Date Created

2024-04-15

Date Modified

2024-05-13

Defense Date

2024-04-08

CIP Code

  • 14.0901

Research Director(s)

Patrick Flynn,Adam Czajka

Committee Members

Walter Scheirer|Kevin Bowyer|Ed Delp|Tim Kelley

Degree

  • Doctor of Philosophy

Degree Level

  • Doctoral Dissertation

Language

  • English

Library Record

006584706

OCLC Number

1433308788

Publisher

University of Notre Dame

Program Name

  • Computer Science and Engineering

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