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Testing the Underlying Mechanism of a Brief Family Conflict Intervention: Longitudinal Changes in Mother-Adolescent and Father-Adolescent Communication

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posted on 2024-03-25, 01:57 authored by Vevette Yang

Community families with adolescents can benefit greatly from evidence-based family intervention research focusing on improving parent-adolescent conflict communication. However, there is limited intervention research for community families with adolescents that examines the changes in parent-adolescent communication to evaluate the intervention effectiveness. This study assessed the short-term intervention effect on post-test assessments of openness and problems in mother-adolescent and father-adolescent communication and explored longitudinal change trajectories of communication scores from pre-test to 3-year follow-up. 225 families were randomly assigned to either parent-adolescent intervention (PA: n = 75), parent-only intervention (PO: n = 75), or control group (n = 75). Results found significant intervention effects for the PA group but not for the PO group. Compared to the control group, PA mothers reported significantly greater openness in mother-adolescent communication, PA adolescents reported significantly greater openness in father-adolescent communication, and PA fathers reported significantly fewer problems in father-adolescent communication. Longitudinal trajectory analysis visualized linear change trajectories for each intervention group. Findings suggest that family intervention programs may differently impact mother-adolescent and father-adolescent communication and underscore the importance of involving both paternal caretakers and adolescents in the intervention process.

History

Date Modified

2023-08-18

Defense Date

2023-05-15

CIP Code

  • 42.2799

Research Director(s)

E. Mark Cummings

Committee Members

Daniel Lapsley Guangjian Zhang

Degree

  • Master of Arts

Degree Level

  • Master's Thesis

Alternate Identifier

1394079939

OCLC Number

1394079939

Program Name

  • Psychology, Research and Experimental

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