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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The church possesses a remarkable early-16th-century rood screen. Dramatically crossing the nave like a bridge with spiral staircases on either side, it is unique in Paris. Also notable is the wood pulpit, supported by Samson with a jawbone in hand and slain lion at his feet.

    Flamboyant refers to the last phase of French Gothic architecture, from about 1370 to the 16th century, as described by antiquarian Arcisse de Caumont (1802-1873). The style is characterized by an intensification and ev…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Flemish pulpit decorated with biblical scenes inlaid with wood, pewter and ivory and dates from 1749.

    A church of the former convent of the Servants of Mary, a mendicant order following the Rule of St. Augustine. Their habit included a white manteau. The church and a fountain (rebuilt in 1929) is all that remains of the convent. The present facade was added by Victor Baltard in 1863, salvaged from the church of St. Eloi des Barnabites, destroyed by the digging of the Boulevard du Palais on t…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    [The church is an example of a Gothic structure clothed in Renaissance detail, and has been attributed to Italian-born architect Domenico da Cortona by Bannister Fletcher. It contains the largest church pipe organ in France.] The initial, original architect is unknown. Nicolas Le Mercier (1541-1637), father of Jacques Le Mercier, worked on St. Eustache as a master mason. Seven chapels were original to the plan, two decorated by Mignard and Lafosse. In 1851 Barrias decorated the chapel of St L…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The first stone of the Church of Saint Roch (Église Saint-Roch) was laid by Louis XIV in 1653, accompanied by his mother Anne of Austria. Originally designed by Jacques Lemercier, construction was halted in 1660 and was resumed in 1701 under the direction of architect Jacques Hardouin-Mansart (brother of Jules). With his façade for St. Roch (designed ca. 1728; built 1736-1738), de Cotte completed one of the major basilicas in Paris. His emphasis on vigorous plasticity and vertical unity was m…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The church was first built in the 13th century and was reconstructed between 1656 and 1763. The bell tower was constructed in 1625. The architects include Michel Noblet and François Levé, working in the employ of Louis XIV. Charles Le Brun may have contributed designs. The apse was redesigned by Baltard in 1862 because of street construction under Haussmann. The façade on the rue Saint-Victor was finally built in 1934. In 1977 the church was occupied by traditionalist Society of St. Pius X an…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A parish hall church mostly noted for the most famous work of Renaissance sculptor Ligier Richier, the Easter Sepulcher or Entombment (stone, 1554-1564), originally an arrangement of 13 over life-size figures. It is located in the right aisle. A church has been on the site since the 8th century. The present church was built 1503 to 1543. The church was designated an historic monument in 1907.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public