Architectural Lantern Slides of France

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Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in France during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include churches and cathedrals, castles, palaces, public buildings, bridges, sculpture, artifacts taken from other countries, and street scenes. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include people and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Bridges

Theaters

Mosques

Windmills

Architecture

Abbeys

Churches

Cathedrals

Fountains

Statues

Hotels

Castles

City Halls

Historical gardens

Palaces

Spatial Coverage

Amiens

Paris

Laon

Bourg-en-Bresse

Fontainebleau

Bayeux

Blois

Limoges

France

Mont-Saint-Michel

Strasbourg

Chartres

Versailles

Vézelay

Chantilly

Rouen

Arles

Saint-Denis

Caen

Dijon

Bourges

Reims

Chambord

Avignon

Chenonceaux

Périgueux

Parc de Saint-Cloud

Tours

Compiègne

Vincennes

Angoulême

Poitiers

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The cathedral, which combines a Romanesque nave and a High Gothic choir, is notable for its rich collection of stained glass and the spectacular bifurcating flying buttresses at its eastern end. The extant cathedral was partially rebuilt on various occasions between the late 11th century and the 15th. In 1151 Geoffrey, Count of Anjou, was buried in the cathedral. It subsequently benefited from the generosity of his son, Henry II of England, who endowed a chapel for Geoffrey, from which surviv…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The cathedral, which combines a Romanesque nave and a High Gothic choir, is notable for its rich collection of stained glass and the spectacular bifurcating flying buttresses at its eastern end. The extant cathedral was partially rebuilt on various occasions between the late 11th century and the 15th. In 1151 Geoffrey, Count of Anjou, was buried in the cathedral. It subsequently benefited from the generosity of his son, Henry II of England, who endowed a chapel for Geoffrey, from which surviv…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The old well in the center was renovated in 1922-1931 and also the double staircase going upstairs.

    Classified as a historical monument since 1862; cloister classified 1875. The two-story Romanesque cloister dates to the 12th century. The wooden vaults of the galleries of the cloister are 14th century. The church has a long building period starting with the baptistery, which is paleo-Christian, 5th century and Merovingian in style. It is octagonal with eight re-used Roman Corinthian columns….

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The construction of the cathedral began in 1434, on the site of a Romanesque cathedral, and took 457 years to finish, finally reaching completion in 1891. The first architect in charge was Guillaume de Dammartin who was later replaced by Mathurin Rodier. The construction began with the west façade, the aisles of the nave and its lateral chapels. Most of the stained glass dates from ca. 1500-1516. The rest of the north transept and the choir, under the direction of St. Felix Seheult (city arch…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The construction of the church of Saint-Pierre runs from the thirteenth to the seventeenth century. Most of what is still visible today dates from the fifteenth century, rebuilt after the Hundred Years War. In the sixteenth century, the church was enlarged with the construction of the last two bays and west towers. The west facade dates from 1524; it has two towers, the south (right) tower (called “St. Anne”) was never completed, the north (left) tower (“St. Vincent”) was …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The present cathedral replaces the 13th century Romanesque building. The first phase concerned the south transept and the towers, as early as 1170. The chancel was rebuilt from 1236 to 1279 by Étienne de Mortagne but the nave took much longer to build. The architect Simon du Mans rebuilt the transept and started the nave, including six spans, aisle and chapel, built during the 14th century. The first two spans correspond to those of the old Romanesque cathedral and date back to the 12th centu…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Cathedral of the Trinity (La Trinité) is mostly Romanesque and Early Gothic (Angevin Gothic) in character. Begun in ca. 1070, with many building campaigns. The central tower dates from 1110. In 1537 Jamet Neveu, master mason, built two chapels. The church has six Aubusson tapestries in the interior. Listed as an historic monument in 1840, it became a cathedral in 1855.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The cathedral of St. Maurice is a fine representative of the regional style known as Angevin Gothic. Its characteristic single-nave construction gives it a smoothly unified exterior broken only by the two west towers. This powerful spatial unity is also evident in the clarity of the cruciform plan, with a nave of three square bays, a single bay on each arm of the transept, and a square choir bay leading to a semicircular apse. The design, however, falls into two principal phases. The nave, wh…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Below the procession of the saved, separated by pilasters and columns of dark stone, are statues of saints connected with the history of Arles; from left, St. Bartholomew, St. James the Great, St. Trophimus, St. John the Evangelist, and St. Peter. The bases of the columns are decorated with statues of lions.

    The outer walls of the present cathedral of St Trophîme are normally assigned to the Carolingian period. The church was reconstructed with a nave and aisles in the Romanesque style durin…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The left portal (Porte St-Jean) is an important survivor of the 12th-century Early Gothic period. The tympanum depicts the martyrdom of St. John the Baptist. In the lower register, Salome performs a balancing act (like a medieval jongleur) before King Herod, John is executed, and his head is presented on a platter. The upper register illustrates the legend that John was taken into heaven in ecstasy just before his death.

    The present building comprises an aisled nave of 11 bays, with a series…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Below the procession of the damned, separated by pilasters and columns of dark stone, are statues of saints connected with the history of Arles; on the right, St. Philip, St. James the Just, St. Stephen, St. Andrew, and St. Paul. The bases of the columns are decorated with statues of lions including Daniel in the Lion’s Den.

    The outer walls of the present cathedral of St Trophîme are normally assigned to the Carolingian period. The church was reconstructed with a nave and aisles in the R…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    It is the seat of the Bishop of Verdun. Several buildings were erected and destroyed on this site, until in 990 Bishop Heimon ordered the construction of a new cathedral on the Romano-Rhenish plan: a nave, two transepts, two opposing apses, each one flanked by two belltowers. In the 12th century the architect Garin built the east choir, the two portals of Saint John and of the Lion, and the crypts. The building was consecrated by Pope Eugene III in 1147. The cloister seems also to have been b…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01