Architectural Lantern Slides of United Kingdom

Collection Details Full Record
Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in the United Kingdom during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include castles, churches, cathedrals, colleges, prisons, public buildings, and public squares. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include persons and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

City walls

Castles

Churches

Bridges

Palaces

Abbeys

Arches

Museums

Colleges

Architecture

Spatial Coverage

Shrewsbury

Caernarfon

Kenilworth

United Kingdom

Cambridge

Oxford

London

Eton

Salisbury

Scotland

Glasgow

Windsor Castle

Ely

England

Edinburgh

York

Carlisle

Warwick

Rievaulx

Fountains Abbey

Windsor

Wollaton

Wales

Stirling

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The principal window at the east end (which is the top nave of the cross,) appears to have been more recently built than the others, and is 57 feet (17 m) in extreme height, and 28 feet (8.5 m) wide. This view has been painted by J.M.W Turner and others.

    Melrose Abbey was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks, on the request of King David I of Scotland. The east end of the abbey was completed in 1146. Other buildings in the complex were added over the next 50 years. The abbey was built in the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Rievaulx Abbey is a former Cistercian abbey located in the village of Rievaulx, near Helmsley in North Yorkshire, England. Rievaulx was founded in 1132 by Walter Espec, a powerful northern baron and landowner, with monks from Clairvaux in eastern France. The Abbey began to decline in the late 13th century. By 1380 only fifteen monks and three lay brothers are mentioned. It was once one of the wealthiest abbeys in England and was dissolved by Henry VIII of England in 1538. In 1758 the still-ex…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Melrose Abbey was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks, on the request of King David I of Scotland. The east end of the abbey was completed in 1146. Other buildings in the complex were added over the next 50 years. The abbey was built in the form of a St. John’s cross. It is known for its many carved decorative details. A considerable portion of the abbey is now in ruins, though a structure dating from 1590 is maintained as a museum open to the public. Alexander II and other Scottish kings…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The late 12th-century refectory measured 37.8 by 11.9 m and was one of the largest of its type in England. The interior was decorated by blind arcades alternating with 21 large lancet windows, which poured light on the monks as they assembled for their daily meal. Access from the cloister was through a trefoil-headed doorway flanked by blind arcading and fronted by lead-lined troughs, in which the monks washed their hands before meals.

    Rievaulx Abbey is a former Cistercian abbey located in t…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The eastern transept of the abbey church, completed ca. 1247.

    Fountains Abbey was founded in 1132 following a dispute at St. Mary’s Abbey in York. Thirteen exiled Benedictine monks were supplied with a site in the valley of the River Skell and joined the Cistercian order in 1135. The land was well watered, both by the River Skell and by six springs, hence the name St. Mary of the Springs, latinized to ‘de Fontibus’. Along with Rievaulx, it was the most important Cistercian abbey …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    From ca. 1200 until its dissolution in 1539 St. Mary’s Abbey was the richest monastic house in the north of England. This is attested by the remains of its 13th-, 14th- and 15th-century buildings (now in ruins). The church chancel is Romanesque, but had the most important extant Early Gothic sculpture in England (now in York Museum). The eastern arm of the church (begun 1270) was a nine-bay aisled rectangle of a locally well-established type. Other buildings include a chapter house and th…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public