Search CurateND

Search criteria:

Clear all

List of files deposited in CurateND that match your search criteria

  • Description:

    Lantern slides created in the United Kingdom during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include castles, churches, cathedrals, colleges, prisons, public buildings, and public squares. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include persons and fashions of the time.

    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Dar al-Imara (913-914), the original nucleus of the Alcázar, was built over the old basilica by the Umayyad ruler Abd al-Rahman III (reg 912-961) and was enlarged in the 11th century by a series of fortified walls extending towards the west, which resulted in a new palace complex called Alcázar al-Mubarak, or El Bendito. After the Reconquista the Alcázar became the favourite residence of the monarchs of Castile. Peter the Cruel (reigned 1350-1369) substantially rebuilt (1364-1366) the Alc…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    An Iberian settlement preceded Roman Segobriga, settled ca. 19 BCE under the reign of Augustus. Parts of the Roman walls and the gates of S Andrés, S Cebrián and Santiago remain intact. Under the Moors in the 8th century, the walls enclosed a perimeter of 3 kilometers, with eighty towers and five gates. In 1985 the old city of Segovia and its Aqueduct were declared World Heritage by UNESCO.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    This tower was modified in 1901 to admit street traffic. This view is before the modification.

    In the second half of the 14th century the Musegg wall, 870 m long, with nine towers and one of the longest fortifications in Switzerland, was built round the city. Three of the nine towers are accessible to tourists today. The names of the nine towers are Nolli, Mannli, Luegisland, Heu, Zyt, Schirmer, Pulver, Allenwinden, and Dachli.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In Paul’s time, the city of Damascus was surrounded by a wall pierced by seven gates. Bab Kisan is the gate on the southeastern side of Damascus and was dedicated to Saturn. It seems reasonable that the Bab Kisan was the gate through which Paul escaped. This southeastern district of the city was not only very close to the start of the Roman road that St. Paul would have taken, but was also the part where, from the earliest times, the Christians used to live. Early Christian tradition iden…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    One of the southern gates in the 3rd-century Aurelian Walls of Rome, Italy. The Ostiense Museum is housed within in the gatehouse. Just to the west is the Pyramid of Cestius, an Egyptian-style pyramid, and beyond that is the Protestant Cemetery. The original name of the gate was Porta Ostiensis because it was located at the beginning of via Ostiense, the road that connected Rome and Ostia. It was enlarged and the towers extended by Honorius. Later, it was renamed to the Italian Porta San Paol…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The limits on the Roman town, were the earliest known walls to the city. During the 10th and 11th centuries, the town grew to the east and later to the north, in what is now the Camollia district. Walls were built to totally surround the city, and a second set was finished by the end of the 13th century. Much of these walls still exist today. The Porta Romana, one of the old gates in the city walls of Siena, guarded the road leading to Rome. The gate was built starting in 1327.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Porta San Giovanni is a gate in the Aurelian Wall of Rome, Italy, named after the nearby Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano. In preparation for the Holy Year of 1575, Pope Gregory XIII reopened ancient roads, such as the Via Tuscolana, and laid new ones, most notably the Via Merulana, linking S Maria Maggiore with the Lateran and the Via Gregoriana, leading from the Monte Cavallo to Trinità dei Monti. At S Giovanni in Laterano, Giacomo del Duca was commissioned to design a new rusticated po…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    During the 14th century both the climax and the downfall of the free comune of Perugia took place. Its expansion necessitated the construction of a second city wall to protect the suburbs, producing the city’s characteristic star-shaped plan. This gate stands at the end of Corso Garibaldi, the main street of part of the city that was surrounded by walls between the 13th and 14th century. In 1479 a massive donjon was erected to surmount the gate.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Probably Castello Saraceno

    The city is located on a plateau below Mount Tauro, for which it is named, where there are the ruins of two medieval fortresses. The larger castle on the highest ground (in the Castelmola district) overlooks the city. It affords a spectacular view, though it is somewhat distant from Taormina and is not particularly well preserved. The “Saracen” castle (called Castello di Taormina or Castello Saraceno) atop Mount Tauro was probably built by the Arabs on an…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    There were originally Roman walls surrounding Asisium, dating from 2nd century BCE. These ran some 2.5 km. As the medieval city grew, a new ring of medieval walls and gates was constructed, from ca. 1260. By 1316 there were five “riones” with a gate. The length of the city walls had increased from the 2.5 km of the Roman circuit to 4.6 km. The new circuit contained the two fortresses that Cardinal Albornoz (arrived in Assisi in 1354) built at this time: Rocca Maggiore and Rocca Mino…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Porta Settimiana is an ancient Roman gate in the Aurelian Wall in Rome. It was rebuilt in 1498 by Pope Alexander VI, and it marks the beginning of the Via della Lungara on the south side.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public