Architectural Lantern Slides of United Kingdom

Collection Details Full Record
Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in the United Kingdom during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include castles, churches, cathedrals, colleges, prisons, public buildings, and public squares. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include persons and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

City walls

Castles

Churches

Bridges

Palaces

Abbeys

Arches

Museums

Colleges

Architecture

Spatial Coverage

Shrewsbury

Caernarfon

Kenilworth

United Kingdom

Cambridge

Oxford

London

Eton

Salisbury

Scotland

Glasgow

Windsor Castle

Ely

England

Edinburgh

York

Carlisle

Warwick

Rievaulx

Fountains Abbey

Windsor

Wollaton

Wales

Stirling

Search CurateND

Search criteria:

Collection: Architectural Lantern Slides of United Kingdom remove ×
Clear all

List of files deposited in CurateND that match your search criteria

  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The gatehouse on the north side survives from the Tudor period, flanked by polygonal turrets with mock battlements, fitted with Georgian sash windows.

    The palace was commissioned by Henry VIII, on the site of a former leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less. St. James’s Palace is one of London’s oldest palaces. It is situated in Pall Mall. Although no sovereign has resided there for almost two centuries, it has remained the official residence of the Sovereign and the Royal C…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The London Times criticized the clock when first built: “Mr Street’s new clock at the Law courts, hung out in the picturesque style of Bow Church, is surely too trivial and small.”

    The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is the building in London which houses the Court of Appeal of England and Wales and the High Court of Justice of England and Wales (Supreme Court). It was opened by Queen Victoria in December 1882. It is on The Strand, in the City of Westmi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The site of the church was first used in the 9th century by Danes, who built a church dedicated to St. Clement, patron saint of mariners. A medieval church was demolished for the current building. It is situated outside the Royal Courts of Justice on the Strand. The current building was completed in 1682 by Sir Christopher Wren and it now functions as the central church of the Royal Air Force. The steeple was added to the 115 foot tower from 1719-1720 by James Gibbs. It was bombed in WWII, an…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Eton College, often referred to simply as Eton, is a British independent (“public”) school for boys aged 13 to 18. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as “The King’s College of Our Lady of Eton besides Wyndsor”. The brick gatehouse of the east range of Schoolyard (west range of Cloister) was begun in the 1440s but finished by Lupton in 1517-1520. The clock is 18th century as are the open crowning lead cupolas above the polygonal turrets. This was an early use of br…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The abbey’s two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745 by Nicholas Hawksmoor, constructed from Portland stone to an early example of a Gothic Revival design. Further rebuilding and restoration occurred in the 19th century under Sir George Gilbert Scott. “In 1723, on the death of Wren, he became architect to Westminster Abbey, the west gable (1735) and towers (1734-1745) of which are his; they also are Gothic in texture and feeling rather than in detail. On this occasion the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    On 16 October 1834, most of the Palace was destroyed by fire. Only Westminster Hall, the Jewel Tower, the crypt of St Stephen’s Chapel and the cloisters survived. A Royal Commission was appointed to study the rebuilding of the Palace and decided that it should be rebuilt on the same site, and that its style should be either Gothic or Elizabethan. A heated public debate over the proposed styles ensued. It was decided that neo-Classical design, similar to that of the White House and Congres…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The column in front is the Westminster School Crimean War Monument, 1861 by John Birnie Philip and Sir George Gilbert Scott.

    The abbey’s two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745 by Nicholas Hawksmoor, constructed from Portland stone to an early example of a Gothic Revival design. Further rebuilding and restoration occurred in the 19th century under Sir George Gilbert Scott. “In 1723, on the death of Wren, he became architect to Westminster Abbey, the west gable (1735) and…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01