Architectural Lantern Slides of Italy

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Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in Italy during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include arenas, basilicas, cathedrals, chapels, churches, fountains, gardens, loggias, public buildings, ruins, sculpture, tombs. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include people and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Theaters

Churches

Palaces

Fountains

Temples

City halls

Architecture

Monuments

Statues

Cathedral

Monasteries

Spatial Coverage

Siena

Agrigento

Florence

Pisa

Italy

Venice

Palermo

Ravenna

Vicenza

Padua

Tivoli

Pompeii

Vatican City

Perugia

Pistoia

Rome

Brescia

Mantua

Verona

Assisi

Naples

Bologna

Milan

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    It is the third edifice built in the same site. The first one was erected after the Edict of Milan in 313 and destroyed by an earthquake on January 3, 1117. Rebuilt in Romanesque style, this was remodeled during the Renaissance beginning in 1551, until 1754; the façade remained unfinished. The appearance of the medieval church can be seen in the frescoes (1375-1380) by Giusto de’ Menabuoi in the annexed Baptistry.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    It is dedicated to Saint Ambrose of Milan and Saint Charles Borromeo. Its construction was begun in honor of the canonization of St. Charles Borromeo in 1610, under the direction of Onorio Longhi and, after his death, of his son Martino Longhi the Younger. It is chiefly remarkable for introducing such north Italian (Lombard) features as the continuous ambulatory (reminiscent of Milan Cathedral) into the mainstream of Roman architecture. The dome, resembling that of Santi Luca e Martina, was d…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The current edifice is largely a reconstruction from 1498-1504. The dome, built between 1504 and 1508, perhaps on a design by Cozzarelli was built at the expense of the signore of Siena, Pandolfo Petrucci. It has a notable Renaissance portal (1519) by Baldassarre Peruzzi, while the interior houses numerous artworks by artists including Il Sodoma and Francesco Vanni. The sacristy is located where there was once a cloister.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The cupola was probably not included on Michelangelo’s 1547 model, and it was not until 1558 that the carpenters began work on the larger-scale model (1:5; Rome, Vatican, Mus. Stor. A. Tesoro S Pietro) for the drum and dome, which Michelangelo justifiably felt to be the last task of his life (he was then 83). Whereas Bramante and Antonio da Sangallo (ii) had favoured an all'antica single-shell dome, Michelangelo’s was to be composed of two hemispherical shells. His starting-point …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Byzantine dome to the left and Romanesque campanile to the right. The main entry to the church is still through the attached campanile, not through this portico.

    In a Greek–Arab document of 1143, preserved in the archives of the Cappella Palatina, Admiral George of Antioch (a Greek and a principle minister of the Norman King Roger II of Sicily) declares that he has erected the church of S Maria and spared no effort or expense in its decoration. In 1139 a convent of Benedictine nuns was found…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The design of the cupola has been attributed to Palladio. The statue is of Victor Emanuele II (1890) by Augusto Benvenuti.

    The design of the cupola is attributed to Palladio. The cathedral was started in the 11th century and rebuilt in the 15th century. Lorenzo da Bologna started the rebuilding in 1481.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    San Cataldo is a notable example of Norman architecture. The church is annexed to that of Santa Maria dell'Ammiraglio [La Martorana]. Founded around 1160 by admiral Majone di Bari, in the 18th century the church was used as a post office. In the 19th century it was restored and brought back to a Medieval form. It has a rectangular plan with blind arches, partially occupied by windows. The ceiling has three characteristics red, bulge domes (cubole) and Arab-style merlons. The interior has …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The cathedral is a basilica with double aisles of different widths, a matroneo (“women’s gallery”) and an apsidal east end. The new façade was begun (ca. 1110-1125) by Rainaldo and his workshop, who probably also lengthened the nave by three bays. The cathedral was consecrated in 1118 under Pope Gelasius (reigned 1118-1119). The façade was possibly completed ca. 1165 by Guglielmo and his school.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The construction of the Duomo Nuovo involved the most influential local architects. Ludovico Beretta prepared a design (untraced) in 1566 for the proposed rebuilding of Brescia Cathedral, which in 1567 was admired by Palladio for its ‘bella invenzione’; the cathedral was eventually reconstructed to a project (1604) by Giovanni Battista Lantana (1581-1627). Giovan Battista Marchetti (1686-1758) was responsible for the design of the façade and Rodolfo Vantini (1791-1865) for the steep d…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The cathedral is a basilica with double aisles of different widths, a matroneo (“women’s gallery”) and an apsidal east end. The new façade was begun (ca. 1110-1125) by Rainaldo and his workshop, who probably also lengthened the nave by three bays. The cathedral was consecrated in 1118 under Pope Gelasius (reigned 1118-1119). The façade was possibly completed ca. 1165 by Guglielmo and his school.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The campanile is the famous leaning tower (Torre pendente di Pisa), begun 1173.

    The cathedral is a basilica with double aisles of different widths, a matroneo (“women’s gallery”) and an apsidal east end. The new façade was begun (ca. 1110-1125) by Rainaldo and his workshop, who probably also lengthened the nave by three bays. The cathedral was consecrated in 1118 under Pope Gelasius (reigned 1118-1119). The façade was possibly completed ca. 1165 by Guglielmo and his school.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Side of cathedral with south porch to the left, apse and dome in center, and towers visible to the right. This external wall is largely 12th century except for the dome (18th century) and porch (added 1453).

    Palermo Cathedral fuses the Latin basilican plan with the centralized Byzantine one. The four corner towers were completed in the 14th century, and the portal of the west façade is dated 1352-1353. In 1426 Antonio Gambara constructed the south portal, with wooden doors (1432) carved by F…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public