Architectural Lantern Slides of India (includes present-day Pakistan)

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Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created under the British colonial occupation of the Indian subcontinent, the British Raj, in the late 19th and early 20th century. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Image subjects include gardens, mosques, palaces, pagodas, temples, and tombs. Some images include people and fashions of the time. The collection includes images from present-day India and Pakistan.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Palaces

Historical gardens

Architecture

Temples

Spatial Coverage

Delhi

Lahore

Thanjavur

Pushkar

Kolkata

Vārānasi

Agra

Fatehpur Sikri

Gwalior

Hyderābād

Chennai

Srirangam

Āmer

Udaipur

India

Ahmadabad

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The lake is now dry.

    Built near the much older Sikri, the historical city of Fatehabad, as it was first named, was constructed by the Mughal emperor Akbar beginning in 1570. (His “city” was largely a mosque and palace complex.) It remained his capital until 1580s; inadequate water supply forced the evacuation of the city in 1605. Two of the buildings of the palace complex are the Diwan-i-Aam (public audience hall) and the Panch Mahal, a five-storied palatial structure, the highest …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Udaipur was chosen by Maharana Udai Singh (reigned 1567-1572) of the Sisodia Rajputs as the new capital of the Mewar state, after the previous Mewar capital, the hilltop fortress of Chittorgarh, was sacked by the Mughal Emperor Akbar. The colossal City Palace was built on the east bank of Lake Pichola. The palace was begun by Udai Singh but dates mainly from the 17th and 18th centuries (building permitted by the Mughal overlords). It consists of a series of buildings faced in white plaster wi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Away from the river front and on a lower level, the Divan-i ‛Am (“Hall of Public Audience”) occupies one side of a vast courtyard. The hall is open on three sides. Three aisles of cusped arches form the interior, which is nine bays across and which has nine cusped arches forming the western façade. The repeated line of the arches receding down the vast aisles creates a sense of harmony as well as splendour. The throne chamber, recessed in the eastern wall, is of white marble embelli…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In 1724 the city once again became the headquarters of a ruling dynasty, the Asaf Shahis. These sultans, otherwise known as the Nizams of Hyderabad, became the most powerful in the Deccan. Asaf Jah began as the Mughal governor of the region (a “nabob”) before he declared his independence and established a dynasty which ruled for seven generations until 1948. The Chaumhalla Palace complex is made up of four palaces: the Afzal Mahal, Mahtab Mahal, Tahniyat Mahal and Aftab Mahal, all a…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The fortress sits on a rocky plateau above the town. In the late 14th century the Tomara Rajputs, keen patrons of music, painting and architecture, were able to assert their independence. The most splendid reminder of Tomara rule is the palace of Raja Man Singh (reigned 1486-1516), known as the Man Mandir. The palace is a multi-storey structure dramatically situated at the edge of the Fort (plateau) overlooking the city. The Hathi Por (Hindi: “elephant gate”) is richly carved and fl…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The fortress sits on a rocky plateau above the town. In the late 14th century the Tomara Rajputs, keen patrons of music, painting and architecture, were able to assert their independence. The most splendid reminder of Tomara rule is the palace of Raja Man Singh (reigned 1486-1516), known as the Man Mandir. The palace is a multi-storey structure dramatically situated at the edge of the Fort (plateau) overlooking the city. The Hathi Por (Hindi: “elephant gate”) is richly carved and fl…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Udaipur was chosen by Maharana Udai Singh (reigned 1567-1572) of the Sisodia Rajputs as the new capital of the Mewar state, after the previous Mewar capital, the hilltop fortress of Chittorgarh, was sacked by the Mughal Emperor Akbar. The colossal City Palace was built on the east bank of Lake Pichola. The palace was begun by Udai Singh but dates mainly from the 17th and 18th centuries (building permitted by the Mughal overlords). It consists of a series of buildings faced in white plaster wi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    This might be what is now the Usha Kiran Palace nearby?

    The palace was designed by Lt. Col. Sir Michael Filose (the grandson of an Italian, and a hereditary Scindia nobleman himself). The Scindia rulers (Maratha clan, Maharajas of Ujjain and Gwalior), who took control in the 19th century, made Gwalior one of the leading states of British India. The Lashkar district’s most famous building is the Jai Vilas Palace, built in an eclectic Indo-Classical style. The spacious durbar (audience hal…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Udaipur was chosen by Maharana Udai Singh (reigned 1567-1572) of the Sisodia Rajputs as the new capital of the Mewar state, after the previous Mewar capital, the hilltop fortress of Chittorgarh, was sacked by the Mughal Emperor Akbar. The colossal City Palace was built on the east bank of Lake Pichola. The palace was begun by Udai Singh but dates mainly from the 17th and 18th centuries (building permitted by the Mughal overlords). It consists of a series of buildings faced in white plaster wi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The fortress sits on a rocky plateau above the town. In the late 14th century the Tomara Rajputs, keen patrons of music, painting and architecture, were able to assert their independence. The most splendid reminder of Tomara rule is the palace of Raja Man Singh (reigned 1486-1516), known as the Man Mandir. The palace is a multi-storey structure dramatically situated at the edge of the Fort (plateau) overlooking the city. The Hathi Por (Hindi: “elephant gate”) is richly carved and fl…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In 1724 the city once again became the headquarters of a ruling dynasty, the Asaf Shahis. These sultans, otherwise known as the Nizams of Hyderabad, became the most powerful in the Deccan. European-style architecture was introduced in Hyderabad during the 18th century. The Falaknuma Palace (1872) was an imposing exercise in Neo-classicism inspired by the villas of Andrea Palladio. It is now a luxury hotel.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Royal families from all over India built palaces on [above] the ghats, the Marathas in particular being responsible for much building after the decline of Muslim rule. Manikarnika Ghat is regarded as the oldest and most sacred, because of its relationship with the Manikarnika Well (mentioned in the Kasikhanda puraṇa), water from which is said to wash away all sins of the soul. Also known as the Cremation Ghat, it is slowly subsiding into the water, and one of its three temples has been comple…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01