Architectural Lantern Slides of United Kingdom

Collection Details Full Record
Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in the United Kingdom during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include castles, churches, cathedrals, colleges, prisons, public buildings, and public squares. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include persons and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

City walls

Castles

Churches

Bridges

Palaces

Abbeys

Arches

Museums

Colleges

Architecture

Spatial Coverage

Shrewsbury

Caernarfon

Kenilworth

United Kingdom

Cambridge

Oxford

London

Eton

Salisbury

Scotland

Glasgow

Windsor Castle

Ely

England

Edinburgh

York

Carlisle

Warwick

Rievaulx

Fountains Abbey

Windsor

Wollaton

Wales

Stirling

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Stands at the intersection of Lambeth Road and Lambeth Palace Road, just off Lambeth Bridge.

    Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury. It is located in Lambeth, on the south bank of the River Thames a short distance upstream of the Palace of Westminster on the opposite shore. It was acquired by the archbishopric around 1200. The oldest remaining part of the palace is the Early English chapel. The so-called Lollard’s Tower dates from 1440. There is a…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The central inset colonnade with its pedimented attic above and dome behind provides a discreet central emphasis. (Sir Banister Fletcher). Construction of the Victoria Embankment to the designs of Sir Joseph Bazalgette began in 1864 and was completed in July 1870.

    Somerset House is a large building situated on the south side of the Strand in central London, England, overlooking the River Thames, just east of Waterloo Bridge. The central block of the Neoclassical building, the outstanding pro…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Tate’s original premises on Millbank, the former site of Millbank Prison. The front part of the building was designed by Sidney R. J. Smith with a classical portico and dome behind. Construction, undertaken by Higgs and Hill, commenced in 1893. The gallery opened on 21 July 1897 as the National Gallery of British Art, but became commonly known as the Tate Gallery, after its founder Sir Henry Tate. There have been several extensions over the years. The central sculpture gallery was des…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Bridge of Sighs in Cambridge is a covered bridge belonging to St. John’s College of Cambridge University. It was built in 1831 and crosses the River Cam between the college’s Third Court and New Court. The architect was Henry Hutchinson. It is named after the Bridge of Sighs in Venice, although they have little architecturally in common beyond the fact that they are both covered. The bridge is one of Cambridge’s main tourist attractions and Queen Victoria is said to have loved…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Magdalen Bridge was designed by John Gwynn of Shrewsbury and built 1772-1790; widened in 1882.

    Magdalen College was founded in 1458 by William of Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester. It stands next to the River Cherwell and has within its grounds a deer park and Addison’s Walk. The large, square Magdalen Tower is a famous Oxford landmark, and it is a tradition since the days of Henry VII that the college choir sings from the top of it at 6 a.m. on May Morning. The Great Tower was built betwe…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    image is flipped

    Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury. It is located in Lambeth, on the south bank of the River Thames a short distance upstream of the Palace of Westminster on the opposite shore. It was acquired by the archbishopric around 1200. The oldest remaining part of the palace is the Early English chapel. The so-called Lollard’s Tower dates from 1440. There is a fine Tudor brick gatehouse built by Cardinal John Morton in 1495. The Great…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    One of a series of castles that William I (reigned 1066-1087) established around London, Windsor occupied the nearest strong point in the Thames Valley to the west of the city. By the reign of Henry I (1100-1135) the creation of a large hunting forest, together with the proximity of London, made this a favoured royal residence as well as a fortress. It is the largest inhabited castle in the world and the oldest in continuous occupation. In 1992 a fire damaged approximately one-fifth of the ca…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public