Architectural Lantern Slides of Italy

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Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in Italy during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include arenas, basilicas, cathedrals, chapels, churches, fountains, gardens, loggias, public buildings, ruins, sculpture, tombs. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include people and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Theaters

Churches

Palaces

Fountains

Temples

City halls

Architecture

Monuments

Statues

Cathedral

Monasteries

Spatial Coverage

Siena

Agrigento

Florence

Pisa

Italy

Venice

Palermo

Ravenna

Vicenza

Padua

Tivoli

Pompeii

Vatican City

Perugia

Pistoia

Rome

Brescia

Mantua

Verona

Assisi

Naples

Bologna

Milan

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The fountain is probably located in the Temple of Saturn, an ancient Roman temple to the god Saturn. The ruins stand at the foot of the Capitoline Hill in Rome. The original dedication of the temple is traditionally dated to 497 BC. The temple was completely reconstructed by Munatius Plancus in 42 BC. The present ruins represent the third phase of the Temple of Saturn, which was built after a fire in 360 AD.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A large Roman archaeological complex at Tivoli, Italy. The villa was constructed at Tibur (modern-day Tivoli) as a retreat from Rome for Roman Emperor Hadrian during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD. Hadrian is said to have disliked the palace on the Palatine Hill in Rome, leading to the construction of the retreat. Hadrian’s Villa is a vast area of land with many pools, baths, fountains and classical Greek and Roman architecture set in what would have been a mixture of …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    On the highest point of the town (some way from the other temples), in the Sanctuary of Athena, is the temple of Athena. It was built in about 500 BCE, and was for some time incorrectly thought to have been dedicated to Ceres. The architecture is transitional, being partly in the Ionic mode and partly early Doric.

    Ancient city of Paestum was established by Greek colonists from Sybaris, who called it Poseidonia; taken by Lucanians 5th century BCE and by Romans 273 BCE; was famous for its rose…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Sanctuary of Hera contains two temples, popularly misnamed the “Basilica” and the “Temple of Neptune”. The “Basilica”, or first Temple of Hera (ca. 550-525 BCE), is a pseudodipteral Doric building with 9 x 18 columns and measuring 24.51 x 54.27 m. Its odd number of façade columns seems to be an unusual device to make the plan more regular.

    Ancient city of Paestum was established by Greek colonists from Sybaris, who called it Poseidonia; taken by Lucanians 5t…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Second Temple of Hera to the right, first Temple of Hera to the left. The Sanctuary of Hera contains two temples, popularly misnamed the “Basilica” and the “Temple of Neptune”.

    Ancient city of Paestum was established by Greek colonists from Sybaris, who called it Poseidonia; taken by Lucanians 5th century BCE and by Romans 273 BCE; was famous for its roses; was destroyed by Saracens 871 CE; now site of the village of Pesto. There are three major Greek temples, among them,…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The second Temple of Hera probably dates from ca. 460 BCE. It is Doric order, and there are two rows of internal columns, a mainland Greek feature that became more widespread in Sicily and South Italy at this time.

    Ancient city of Paestum was established by Greek colonists from Sybaris, who called it Poseidonia; taken by Lucanians 5th century BCE and by Romans 273 BCE; was famous for its roses; was destroyed by Saracens 871 CE; now site of the village of Pesto. There are three major Greek te…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Paestum, Italy - Temple of Ceres

    Ancient city of Paestum was established by Greek colonists from Sybaris, who called it Poseidonia; taken by Lucanians 5th century BCE and by Romans 273 BCE; was famous for its roses; was destroyed by Saracens 871 CE; now site of the village of Pesto. There are three major Greek temples, among them, on the highest point of the town (some way from the other temples), in the Sanctuary of Athena, is the temple of Athena. It was built in about 500 BCE. The Sanctua…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Rome, Italy - Appian Way

    The Appian Way (Latin and Italian: Via Appia) was the most important ancient Roman road. It is also called the “the queen road”. It connected Rome to Brindisi, Apulia in southeast Italy. The Roman army, for its success, depended on the use of highways to prepare for battle and to afterward refresh and re-equip. The specific Via Appia was used as a main route for military supplies for many years from the middle of the 4th century BC. The road began as a leve…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Rome, Italy - Appian Way

    The Appian Way (Latin and Italian: Via Appia) was the most important ancient Roman road. It is also called the “the queen road”. It connected Rome to Brindisi, Apulia in southeast Italy. The Roman army, for its success, depended on the use of highways to prepare for battle and to afterward refresh and re-equip. The specific Via Appia was used as a main route for military supplies for many years from the middle of the 4th century BC. The road began as a leve…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The so-called Temple of Herakles, at the south-west edge of the city, was the earliest example of Doric monumental architecture from after 500 BCE and was perhaps founded by the tyrant Theron (reigned 488-472 BCE).

    Greek colony on the southern coast of Sicily. Believed to have been founded ca. 580 BCE from Gela, a city further down the coast, it flourished as an independent state until 406 BCE, when it was sacked by the Carthaginians. It maintained some degree of independence until the Roman…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    North of Temple L is the corner of the “Temple of Castor and Pollux”, which is in fact a modern reconstruction from the early 19th century, created using pieces from various other temples.

    Greek colony on the southern coast of Sicily. Believed to have been founded ca. 580 BCE from Gela, a city further down the coast, it flourished as an independent state until 406 BCE, when it was sacked by the Carthaginians. It maintained some degree of independence until the Roman conquest of Sic…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    An ancient open-air theatre in Rome, Italy, built in the closing years of the Roman Republic. It was named after Marcus Marcellus, Emperor Augustus’s nephew, who died five years before its completion. Space for the theatre was cleared by Julius Caesar, who was murdered before it could be begun; the theatre was so far advanced by 17 BCE that part of the celebration of the ludi saeculares took place within the theatre; it was completed in 13 BCE and formally inaugurated in 12 BCE by Augustu…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public