Architectural Lantern Slides of India (includes present-day Pakistan)

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Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created under the British colonial occupation of the Indian subcontinent, the British Raj, in the late 19th and early 20th century. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Image subjects include gardens, mosques, palaces, pagodas, temples, and tombs. Some images include people and fashions of the time. The collection includes images from present-day India and Pakistan.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Palaces

Historical gardens

Architecture

Temples

Spatial Coverage

Delhi

Lahore

Thanjavur

Pushkar

Kolkata

Vārānasi

Agra

Fatehpur Sikri

Gwalior

Hyderābād

Chennai

Srirangam

Āmer

Udaipur

India

Ahmadabad

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Built by the emperor Shah Jahan (reigned 1628-1658) as the tomb for his favourite wife, Arjumand Banu Begum (died 1631). The building’s name (literally “Crown Palace”) is a corruption of the queen’s title, Mumtaz-i Mahal (“Chosen of the Palace”). She died in Khandesh giving birth to her 14th child, while accompanying the emperor on a military campaign. First entombed at Burhanpur, her body was brought to Agra in 1632, when the Taj Mahal was under construction. The …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Built by the emperor Shah Jahan (reigned 1628-1658) as the tomb for his favourite wife, Arjumand Banu Begum (died 1631). The building’s name (literally “Crown Palace”) is a corruption of the queen’s title, Mumtaz-i Mahal (“Chosen of the Palace”). She died in Khandesh giving birth to her 14th child, while accompanying the emperor on a military campaign. First entombed at Burhanpur, her body was brought to Agra in 1632, when the Taj Mahal was under construction. The …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    One of the most impressive buildings within the fort is the Moti Masjid (“Pearl Mosque”), situated north of the Divan-i ‛Am. It is entered through a red sandstone gateway, but the interior is of pure white marble. The courtyard (48.16 x 48.16 m) has arcades on three sides and the prayer-hall on the west. The prayer-hall is three aisles deep and seven bays wide, with seven cusped arches forming the façade. The superstructure consists of three bulbous domes; there are octagonal chatri…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    One of the most impressive buildings within the fort is the Moti Masjid (“Pearl Mosque”), situated north of the Divan-i ‛Am. It is entered through a red sandstone gateway, but the interior is of pure white marble. The courtyard (48.16 x 48.16 m) has arcades on three sides and the prayer-hall on the west. The prayer-hall is three aisles deep and seven bays wide, with seven cusped arches forming the façade. The superstructure consists of three bulbous domes; there are octagonal chatri…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Thanjavur was capital of the Chola dynasty from the mid-9th century AD to the mid-12th, in Tamil Nadu, India. The temple to Shiva as Great Lord (Brihadishvara) is a royal foundation of Rajaraja I (reigned 985-1014), after whom it is best known as Rajarajeshvara. It was consecrated in 1010. Size is its most striking feature, and in its time it must have been the largest temple in India. In addition to the tower (vimana) of the main temple, there are numerous shrines and sculptures, courtyards …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The mosque is one building out of several that comprise the ‘dargah’ or shrine complex of the Muslim saint Shaikh Shah Alam. The saint was spiritual advisor to Sultan Mahmud Shah Begarha (reigned 1458-1511) and his shrine is still an important centre for pilgrimage today. The tombs and assembly hall date to the late fifteenth century, but this mosque was built during the later sixteenth century. It has an open-fronted sanctuary facade with high, staged minarets at either end. The mosq…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The first monumental mausoleum of the Mughal dynasty; Humayun died in 1556. The patron was Humayun’s son Akbar. The tomb is situated in the centre of a series of four-plot gardens (Ind.-Pers. char-bagh), with shallow water channels, pools and paved pathways laid out symmetrically on all sides, the first use in a mausoleum setting. The tomb is constructed of red sandstone and faced with coloured slate. The lavish use of white marble to outline panels and arches was an important precedent f…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In 1724 the city once again became the headquarters of a ruling dynasty, the Asaf Shahis. These sultans, otherwise known as the Nizams of Hyderabad, became the most powerful in the Deccan. Asaf Jah began as the Mughal governor of the region (a “nabob”) before he declared his independence and established a dynasty which ruled for seven generations until 1948. The Chaumhalla Palace complex is made up of four palaces: the Afzal Mahal, Mahtab Mahal, Tahniyat Mahal and Aftab Mahal, all a…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    This is not the hall traditionally called the Hall of 1,000 Columns, which has sculpted columns with rearing horses trampling tigers.

    The site contains two large temple complexes, the Vaishnava Ranganatha and the Shaiva Jambukeshvara. The Ranganatha, with its unique seven enclosures, is the largest temple complex in south India. The present temple was founded during the later Chola period, when Rajendra Chola (ca. 1025) is said to have used prisoners from Sri Lanka to divert the flood waters…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The fortress sits on a rocky plateau above the town. In the late 14th century the Tomara Rajputs, keen patrons of music, painting and architecture, were able to assert their independence. The most splendid reminder of Tomara rule is the palace of Raja Man Singh (reigned 1486-1516), known as the Man Mandir. The palace is a multi-storey structure dramatically situated at the edge of the Fort (plateau) overlooking the city. The Hathi Por (Hindi: “elephant gate”) is richly carved and fl…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The fortress sits on a rocky plateau above the town. In the late 14th century the Tomara Rajputs, keen patrons of music, painting and architecture, were able to assert their independence. The most splendid reminder of Tomara rule is the palace of Raja Man Singh (reigned 1486-1516), known as the Man Mandir. The palace is a multi-storey structure dramatically situated at the edge of the Fort (plateau) overlooking the city. The Hathi Por (Hindi: “elephant gate”) is richly carved and fl…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Udaipur was chosen by Maharana Udai Singh (reigned 1567-1572) of the Sisodia Rajputs as the new capital of the Mewar state, after the previous Mewar capital, the hilltop fortress of Chittorgarh, was sacked by the Mughal Emperor Akbar. The colossal City Palace was built on the east bank of Lake Pichola. The palace was begun by Udai Singh but dates mainly from the 17th and 18th centuries (building permitted by the Mughal overlords). It consists of a series of buildings faced in white plaster wi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01