Architectural Lantern Slides of United Kingdom

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Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in the United Kingdom during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include castles, churches, cathedrals, colleges, prisons, public buildings, and public squares. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include persons and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

City walls

Castles

Churches

Bridges

Palaces

Abbeys

Arches

Museums

Colleges

Architecture

Spatial Coverage

Shrewsbury

Caernarfon

Kenilworth

United Kingdom

Cambridge

Oxford

London

Eton

Salisbury

Scotland

Glasgow

Windsor Castle

Ely

England

Edinburgh

York

Carlisle

Warwick

Rievaulx

Fountains Abbey

Windsor

Wollaton

Wales

Stirling

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The central inset colonnade with its pedimented attic above and dome behind provides a discreet central emphasis. (Sir Banister Fletcher). Construction of the Victoria Embankment to the designs of Sir Joseph Bazalgette began in 1864 and was completed in July 1870.

    Somerset House is a large building situated on the south side of the Strand in central London, England, overlooking the River Thames, just east of Waterloo Bridge. The central block of the Neoclassical building, the outstanding pro…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Imperial Institute, as it was first known, was established in 1887 (Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee) to promote research which would benefit the Empire. Initially this was strongly biased towards scientific research that supported the industrial and commercial development of the dominions and colonies. The Imperial Institute was located in a building on Exhibition Road, South Kensington, designed by T.E. Collcutt in a Hispano-Renaissance style with strong Moorish motifs and built by J…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    St Martin-in-the-Fields is an Anglican church, dedicated to Saint Martin of Tours. The church survived the Great Fire of London which did not reach as far as the City of Westminster, but was replaced with a new building, designed by James Gibbs in 1721 and completed five years later. The design was criticized widely at the time, but subsequently became extremely famous, being copied particularly widely in the United States. The church is essentially rectangular, with a great pediment in the C…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Tate’s original premises on Millbank, the former site of Millbank Prison. The front part of the building was designed by Sidney R. J. Smith with a classical portico and dome behind. Construction, undertaken by Higgs and Hill, commenced in 1893. The gallery opened on 21 July 1897 as the National Gallery of British Art, but became commonly known as the Tate Gallery, after its founder Sir Henry Tate. There have been several extensions over the years. The central sculpture gallery was des…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Main entrance is between the two towers at the right.

    The Natural History Museum is one of three large museums on Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London, England (the others are the Science Museum, and the Victoria and Albert Museum). Its main frontage is on Cromwell Road. The museum is home to life and earth science specimens comprising some 70 million items within five main collections: Botany, Entomology, Mineralogy, Palaeontology and Zoology. Originating from collections within the Br…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The London Times criticized the clock when first built: “Mr Street’s new clock at the Law courts, hung out in the picturesque style of Bow Church, is surely too trivial and small.”

    The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is the building in London which houses the Court of Appeal of England and Wales and the High Court of Justice of England and Wales (Supreme Court). It was opened by Queen Victoria in December 1882. It is on The Strand, in the City of Westmi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The present grand entrance (the east wing of the south front), in “Hindoostani Gothic”, was added in 1788 by George Dance (and restored in 1910).

    It has been used as a town hall for several hundred years, and is still the ceremonial and administrative centre of the City of London and its Corporation. The Guildhall complex houses the offices of the City of London Corporation (only the City; not greater London) and various public facilities. It is a town hall, not actually a guild bu…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The site of the church was first used in the 9th century by Danes, who built a church dedicated to St. Clement, patron saint of mariners. A medieval church was demolished for the current building. It is situated outside the Royal Courts of Justice on the Strand. The current building was completed in 1682 by Sir Christopher Wren and it now functions as the central church of the Royal Air Force. The steeple was added to the 115 foot tower from 1719-1720 by James Gibbs. It was bombed in WWII, an…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Showing the tall, transomed, five-light Perpendicular windows, and the fan vaults.

    King’s College (King’s College of Our Lady and St. Nicholas in Cambridge) was the second royal foundation in Cambridge, inaugurated by Henry VI in 1441. The chapel, dedicated to SS Mary and Nicholas, built from 1448 to 1515, is the only surviving part of the second building plan begun 1448. The chapel is an aisleless limestone building ca. 90 m long and 30 m to the crown of the vault. It is divided int…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The principal window at the east end (which is the top nave of the cross,) appears to have been more recently built than the others, and is 57 feet (17 m) in extreme height, and 28 feet (8.5 m) wide. This view has been painted by J.M.W Turner and others.

    Melrose Abbey was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks, on the request of King David I of Scotland. The east end of the abbey was completed in 1146. Other buildings in the complex were added over the next 50 years. The abbey was built in the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The building as seen today is largely the work of Henry,15th Duke of Norfolk (1847-1917) and the restoration project was completed in 1900.

    Founded by Roger de Montgomery on Christmas Day 1067. Roger became the first to hold the earldom of Arundel by the graces of William the Conqueror. The Fitzalan Chapel dates from 1390. The castle was damaged in the English Civil War and then restored in the 18th and 19th centuries. From the 11th century onward, the castle has served as a hereditary state…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The 19th century neo-Gothic New Court, probably one of the best known buildings in Cambridge, was the first major building built by any of the colleges on the west side of the river. Despite the College’s original intention to get the architects to build another copy of Second Court, plans were eventually accepted for a fashionably romantic building in the ‘Gothic’ style. It is a three-sided court of tall Gothic Revival buildings, closed on the fourth side by an open, seven-bayed …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01