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  • Author(s):
    Thomas V. Merluzzi
    Abstract:

    Background: Hope has been a topic of interest across many centuries and among diverse cultures, gaining particular relevance in crisis and change-seeking times. Research has shown that hope plays an important role in both the context of everyday life as well as in the context of illness. This paper presents an integrative theory of hope, which incorporates uncertainty and control as key drivers of the hope process and also includes appraisal and meaning. Discussion: The new hope theory state…

    Date Created:
    2021-07-18
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Stewart Clem
    Abstract:

    In recent scholarship, moral theologians and readers of Thomas Aquinas have shown increasing sensitivity to the role of the passions in the moral life. Yet these accounts have paid inadequate attention to Thomas’s writings on Christ’s passions as a source of moral reflection. As I argue in this essay, Thomas’s writings on Christ’s human affectivity should not be limited to the concerns of Christology; rather, they should be integrated into a fuller account of the human passions. One upshot of…

    Date Published:
    2018-07
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Stewart Clem
    Abstract:

    Philosopher Harry Frankfurt has famously coined “bullshit” as a technical term— it refers not to outright lying but rather to a casual indifference to truth. Disregard for truth is accepted and even expected in many contexts, yet it creates conditions for gross injustice and dehumanization. I offer an account of widespread cultural indifference to truth as structural sin, a condition I call “truth indifference.” Drawing on Thomas Aquinas’s understanding of the virtue of truth (veracitas), I m…

    Date Published:
    2017-12
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Stewart Clem
    Abstract:

    In this article, I argue that Immanuel Kant fails to provide a satisfactory account of ‘moral debt’ in Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason. More precisely, he fails to answer the question of why we should assume that a debt exists in the first place. In light of recent scholarship on this area of his thought, I sketch some possible readings of Kant on the nature of moral transformation that suggest how he might account for this debt. I then argue that these accounts fail to justify …

    Date Published:
    2018-03
    Record Visibility:
    Public