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  • Author(s):
    Kimberly Rollings, Nancy Wells
    Abstract:

    Strategies to reduce childhood obesity and improve nutrition include creating school food environments that promote healthy eating. Despite well-documented health benefits of fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption, many U.S. school-aged children, especially low-income youth, fail to meet national dietary guidelines for FV intake. The Cafeteria Assessment for Elementary Schools (CAFES) was developed to quantify physical attributes of elementary school cafeteria environments associated with stude…

  • Author(s):
    Kimberly Rollings, Gary Evans
    Abstract:

    Chronic crowding within housing adversely affects psychological well-being, yet little is known about how design attributes contribute to these effects, especially among children. This cross-sectional study first examined associations between residential interior density and children’s (M = 9 years of age) perceived bedroom and home crowding. Second, analyses investigated whether interior design attributes (residential floor plan arrangement measured by space syntax [depth and permeability]; …

    Date Published:
    2019
  • Abstract:

    Categorization of journal articles by methodological approach/TRIP

  • 4

    Article

    Abstract:

    Avey/Desch 2014 ISQ article

  • Abstract:

    Avey/Desch 2014 ISQ article

  • Author(s):
    Stewart Clem
    Abstract:

    In recent scholarship, moral theologians and readers of Thomas Aquinas have shown increasing sensitivity to the role of the passions in the moral life. Yet these accounts have paid inadequate attention to Thomas’s writings on Christ’s passions as a source of moral reflection. As I argue in this essay, Thomas’s writings on Christ’s human affectivity should not be limited to the concerns of Christology; rather, they should be integrated into a fuller account of the human passions. One upshot of…

    Date Published:
    2018-07
  • Author(s):
    Stewart Clem
    Abstract:

    Philosopher Harry Frankfurt has famously coined “bullshit” as a technical term— it refers not to outright lying but rather to a casual indifference to truth. Disregard for truth is accepted and even expected in many contexts, yet it creates conditions for gross injustice and dehumanization. I offer an account of widespread cultural indifference to truth as structural sin, a condition I call “truth indifference.” Drawing on Thomas Aquinas’s understanding of the virtue of truth (veracitas), I m…

    Date Published:
    2017-12
  • Author(s):
    Stewart Clem
    Abstract:

    In this article, I argue that Immanuel Kant fails to provide a satisfactory account of ‘moral debt’ in Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason. More precisely, he fails to answer the question of why we should assume that a debt exists in the first place. In light of recent scholarship on this area of his thought, I sketch some possible readings of Kant on the nature of moral transformation that suggest how he might account for this debt. I then argue that these accounts fail to justify …

    Date Published:
    2018-03
  • Author(s):
    Isabel Cabezas
    Abstract:

    Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the course Eschatology in Art, this paper examines the ways in which the Christian eschatological imagination is expressed in Luca Signorelli’s Capella Nuova fresco cycle at the Cathedral of Orvieto. This cathedral exemplifies how architects and artists used structure and ornament to enhance Catholic teachings. My research, enhanced by a site visit to the cathedral, synthesizes Hans Balthasar’s theoretical ideas of vertical and …

  • Author(s):
    Thomas A. Stapleford
    Abstract:

    From 1910 - 1940, the practice of business and the practice of economics came to inform one another in novel ways, a reconfiguration that included the emergence of econometrics. The core locus for this intersection came from the rise of commercial forecasting—whether analyses of future demand, price and cost fluctuations, or financial markets—based on the analysis of statistical data. Forecasting united a suite of specific interactions with the practice of economics: business support for the …

    Date Published:
    2017-06
  • Author(s):
    Daniel J. Hicks, Thomas A. Stapleford
    Abstract:

    “Practice” has become a ubiquitous term in the history of science, and yet historians have not always reflected on its philosophical import and especially on its potential connections with ethics. In this essay, we draw on the work of the virtue ethicist Alasdair MacIntyre to develop a theory of “communal practices” and explore how such an approach can inform the history of science, including allegations about the corruption of science by wealth or power; consideration of scientific ethics or…

    Date Published:
    2016-09
  • Author(s):
    Thomas A. Stapleford
    Abstract:

    Whereas union leaders in nineteenth-century America often used the phrase “a living wage” to describe appropriate compensation for skilled workers, today that phrase is typically linked to unskilled labor. I argue that the erosion of ties between skilled workers and the living wage occurred in several stages between 1900 and 1930. Having traditionally avoided quantifying the “living wage,” unions were forced to do so within arbitration hearings, especially as these proliferated during and aft…

    Date Published:
    2008