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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Rebuilt by King Edward the Confessor probably in the late 1040s, when he apparently also began the palace. The former Benedictine, now collegiate, church contains an immense quantity of monumental sculpture from the Middle Ages onwards, as well as important medieval paintings. The anonymous life of St Edward the Confessor, written 1065-1067, gives a long description of the parts of the abbey that existed when Edward died in January 1066. The Abbey became the coronation site of Norman kings, b…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    This is the highest Gothic nave in England at 101 feet (31 meters).

    Rebuilt by King Edward the Confessor probably in the late 1040s, when he apparently also began the palace. The former Benedictine, now collegiate, church contains an immense quantity of monumental sculpture from the Middle Ages onwards, as well as important medieval paintings. The anonymous life of St Edward the Confessor, written 1065-1067, gives a long description of the parts of the abbey that existed when Edward died in …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The abbey’s two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745 by Nicholas Hawksmoor, constructed from Portland stone to an early example of a Gothic Revival design. Further rebuilding and restoration occurred in the 19th century under Sir George Gilbert Scott. “In 1723, on the death of Wren, he became architect to Westminster Abbey, the west gable (1735) and towers (1734-1745) of which are his; they also are Gothic in texture and feeling rather than in detail. On this occasion the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The column in front is the Westminster School Crimean War Monument, 1861 by John Birnie Philip and Sir George Gilbert Scott.

    The abbey’s two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745 by Nicholas Hawksmoor, constructed from Portland stone to an early example of a Gothic Revival design. Further rebuilding and restoration occurred in the 19th century under Sir George Gilbert Scott. “In 1723, on the death of Wren, he became architect to Westminster Abbey, the west gable (1735) and…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The conical roofs are later additions (ca. 1841), destroyed in WWII. The building was restored back to the earlier Gothic phase with the top turret with crenellations.

    The church building comprises two separate sections. The original nave section, called the Round Church, and an adjoining rectangular section, built approximately half a century later, called the Chancel. It was designed to recall the holiest place in the Crusaders’ world: the circular Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerus…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    St Martin-in-the-Fields is an Anglican church, dedicated to Saint Martin of Tours. The church survived the Great Fire of London which did not reach as far as the City of Westminster, but was replaced with a new building, designed by James Gibbs in 1721 and completed five years later. The design was criticized widely at the time, but subsequently became extremely famous, being copied particularly widely in the United States. The church is essentially rectangular, with a great pediment in the C…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The church building comprises two separate sections. The original nave section, called the Round Church, and an adjoining rectangular section, built approximately half a century later, called the Chancel. It was designed to recall the holiest place in the Crusaders’ world: the circular Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. After the destruction and abolition of the Knights Templar in 1307, Edward II took control of the church as a Crown possession. It was later given to the Knights H…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The original columns of dark Purbeck marble, seen here, were replaced with replicas after damage in WWII. There are 9 marble effigy tombs of medieval knights in the nave.

    The church building comprises two separate sections. The original nave section, called the Round Church, and an adjoining rectangular section, built approximately half a century later, called the Chancel. It was designed to recall the holiest place in the Crusaders’ world: the circular Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Je…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The site of the church was first used in the 9th century by Danes, who built a church dedicated to St. Clement, patron saint of mariners. A medieval church was demolished for the current building. It is situated outside the Royal Courts of Justice on the Strand. The current building was completed in 1682 by Sir Christopher Wren and it now functions as the central church of the Royal Air Force. The steeple was added to the 115 foot tower from 1719-1720 by James Gibbs. It was bombed in WWII, an…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Showing the tall, transomed, five-light Perpendicular windows, and the fan vaults.

    King’s College (King’s College of Our Lady and St. Nicholas in Cambridge) was the second royal foundation in Cambridge, inaugurated by Henry VI in 1441. The chapel, dedicated to SS Mary and Nicholas, built from 1448 to 1515, is the only surviving part of the second building plan begun 1448. The chapel is an aisleless limestone building ca. 90 m long and 30 m to the crown of the vault. It is divided int…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The principal window at the east end (which is the top nave of the cross,) appears to have been more recently built than the others, and is 57 feet (17 m) in extreme height, and 28 feet (8.5 m) wide. This view has been painted by J.M.W Turner and others.

    Melrose Abbey was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks, on the request of King David I of Scotland. The east end of the abbey was completed in 1146. Other buildings in the complex were added over the next 50 years. The abbey was built in the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Melrose Abbey was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks, on the request of King David I of Scotland. The east end of the abbey was completed in 1146. Other buildings in the complex were added over the next 50 years. The abbey was built in the form of a St. John’s cross. It is known for its many carved decorative details. A considerable portion of the abbey is now in ruins, though a structure dating from 1590 is maintained as a museum open to the public. Alexander II and other Scottish kings…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01