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  • Author(s):
    Catherine Bolten
    Abstract:

    This article analyzes the notion of “normal” post-war development in Makeni, northern Sierra Leone in light of the fact that local people, the national government, and NGOs appear to be at an impasse concerning agricultural practices. I argue that fundamentally different perspectives on what construes desirable post-war development are causing this deadlock. The government adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) to make the country more attractive donors (and more re…

    Date Published:
    2009-11
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Catherine Bolten
    Abstract:

    Civilians in Makeni, Sierra Leone, describe their relationship with the ex-combatants of the rebel RUF as a state of being “sensitized” to their presence. I argue that “sensitization” connotes civilians’ acceptance of ex-combatants living among them, while they refuse to incorporate ex-combatants into the social order. Civilians, although treating the war as a “state of exception,” refuse to grant ex-combatants the grace of belonging to this exceptional time. They question whether youth socia…

    Date Published:
    2012-09
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Catherine Bolten
    Abstract:

    This article uses interviews with former student activists in Sierra Leone to explore what ideals motivate students to participate in political action. In Sierra Leone, students used the military as a cover for their own democratic programme, initially by encouraging a coup that they wanted to partake in, later by joining the officer corps themselves. I challenge the notion that student interactions with the urban lumpenproletariat and ‘ militariat ’ serve as evidence for their desire to cloa…

    Date Published:
    2009-09
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Catherine Bolten, Richard Marcantonio
    Abstract:

    Post-war Sierra Leone has experienced a population explosion that has raised questions among rural farmers about the relationship between family size and poverty. Agricultural decline and the high cost of schooling are not prompting parents to articulate a desire for smaller families; rather, they highlight that the uncertainty around articulating the “right” number of children is unresolvable because the ability to send children to school is predicated on increasing agricultural outputs that…

    Date Published:
    2021
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Catherine Bolten
    Abstract:

    This article examines a case study from war-torn Sierra Leone in 1994, in which a rumor galvanized violent public action and only dissipated when a seemingly unrelated issue was resolved. I argue that the circulation of rumors can foment the emergence of political narratives focused on topics that are otherwise taboo, and creates the space to act on them without overtly disturbing the status quo. I analyze the content of interview material with residents of the town of Makeni and eight months…

    Date Published:
    2014-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Catherine Bolten
    Abstract:

    The wages paid to local employees by international NGOs and the grants given to community organizations are an understudied aspect of the effect of aid on war-affected countries. In this article, I explore how wages and grants become part of social networks in Makeni, in northern Sierra Leone, and argue that cash infusions cause tension within networks and between payees and INGOs because organizations refuse to “inflate” wages and grants, and yet recipients suffer extreme poverty and support…

    Date Published:
    2014-03
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    Tracy Kijewski-Correa
    Description:

    A recent report suggests that for every $1 spent on natural hazard mitigation measures for homes and businesses, society will on average benefit $6 in avoided direct and direct losses. As the political will is generally lacking to mandate and enforce building code revisions that would require owners in earthquake and hurricane zones to make such investments, these considerable economic and societal benefits will only be realized by discovering what would persuade building owners, and especial…

    Date Created:
    2021-02-02
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Thomas A. Stapleford
    Abstract:

    Scientific research, considered in isolation, is often regarded as an amoral activity. In this view, ethics exists only around the margins of research – perhaps in the choice of topics pursued, the treatment of experimental subjects, or the use of results. Such an account seems to explain why brilliant scientists can be deeply flawed, at times even vicious, human beings. It also reflects a distinction between “making” and “acting” that found its most influential formulation in Aristotle’s dis…

    Date Published:
    2018
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Thomas A. Stapleford
    Abstract:

    Malcolm Rorty is best known to historians of economics as the primary organizer and founder of the National Bureau of Economic Research. This essay situations Rorty’s interest in economics against the backdrop of his early career in telephone engineering at American Telephone & Telegraph. I argue that distinct structural features of telephone engineering in general, and AT&T in particular, created overlaps between the practices engineering and economics, and also opened space for Rort…

    Date Published:
    2020-12
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Essaka Joshua
    Abstract:

    “Chaucer’s Ghoast” is an anonymous collection of twelve short poems (one set within a short story in prose) published in London in 1672, and evidently never reprinted since. It has been described as a loose translation of selections from Ovid, and sometimes (e.g. by the NUC) attributed to Charles Cotton (1630-87). Joshua has identified it as a modernization of selections from CA, and reprints ten lines from the two works (from the story of Pygmaleon) to demonstrate the closeness…

    Date Published:
    1997
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Essaka Joshua
    Abstract:

    The picturesque theorists disagree vehemently over whether the picturesque deformity that can be appreciated in buildings and landscapes could also be appreciated in people with deformities, be these people real or represented. William Gilpin writes about ruins and people in ways that suggest that they possess the same aesthetic value. Fitness for representation is Gilpin’s criterion for a certain type of aesthetic appreciation, and, using this criterion, he regards picturesque deformity in a…

    Date Published:
    2016
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Author(s):
    Essaka Joshua
    Abstract:

    Observes that George Bernard Shaw’s play “Pygmalion” is read in a mythographic context that has generally focused exclusively on its connections to Ovid’s version of the myth, contained in “Metamorphoses.” Argues, borrowing from the theories of Lévi-Strauss, that alternative versions of the Pygmalion myth should be studied, as mythic tales are not “static,” but constantly refined through retellings. Explains the use of “contextualisation” in the…

    Date Published:
    1998
    Record Visibility:
    Public