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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The eastern transept of the abbey church, completed ca. 1247.

    Fountains Abbey was founded in 1132 following a dispute at St. Mary’s Abbey in York. Thirteen exiled Benedictine monks were supplied with a site in the valley of the River Skell and joined the Cistercian order in 1135. The land was well watered, both by the River Skell and by six springs, hence the name St. Mary of the Springs, latinized to ‘de Fontibus’. Along with Rievaulx, it was the most important Cistercian abbey …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    From ca. 1200 until its dissolution in 1539 St. Mary’s Abbey was the richest monastic house in the north of England. This is attested by the remains of its 13th-, 14th- and 15th-century buildings (now in ruins). The church chancel is Romanesque, but had the most important extant Early Gothic sculpture in England (now in York Museum). The eastern arm of the church (begun 1270) was a nine-bay aisled rectangle of a locally well-established type. Other buildings include a chapter house and th…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Reflects a mix of styles in vogue simultaneously. First, boldly modelled capitals and bases in a richly articulated style are seen on the tower, built by an Abingdon mason in the 1270s. At St. Mary’s, always a parish church of which the most influential parishioner was the university, Bishop Cobham of Worcester (reigned 1317-1327) paid for an austerely plain two-storey wing, known as the Congregation House, to be added east of the tower. The upper floor served as a university library. Bel…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    This is the highest Gothic nave in England at 101 feet (31 meters).

    Rebuilt by King Edward the Confessor probably in the late 1040s, when he apparently also began the palace. The former Benedictine, now collegiate, church contains an immense quantity of monumental sculpture from the Middle Ages onwards, as well as important medieval paintings. The anonymous life of St Edward the Confessor, written 1065-1067, gives a long description of the parts of the abbey that existed when Edward died in …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Rebuilt by King Edward the Confessor probably in the late 1040s, when he apparently also began the palace. The former Benedictine, now collegiate, church contains an immense quantity of monumental sculpture from the Middle Ages onwards, as well as important medieval paintings. The anonymous life of St Edward the Confessor, written 1065-1067, gives a long description of the parts of the abbey that existed when Edward died in January 1066. The Abbey became the coronation site of Norman kings, b…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The abbey’s two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745 by Nicholas Hawksmoor, constructed from Portland stone to an early example of a Gothic Revival design. Further rebuilding and restoration occurred in the 19th century under Sir George Gilbert Scott. “In 1723, on the death of Wren, he became architect to Westminster Abbey, the west gable (1735) and towers (1734-1745) of which are his; they also are Gothic in texture and feeling rather than in detail. On this occasion the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The column in front is the Westminster School Crimean War Monument, 1861 by John Birnie Philip and Sir George Gilbert Scott.

    The abbey’s two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745 by Nicholas Hawksmoor, constructed from Portland stone to an early example of a Gothic Revival design. Further rebuilding and restoration occurred in the 19th century under Sir George Gilbert Scott. “In 1723, on the death of Wren, he became architect to Westminster Abbey, the west gable (1735) and…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A Roman Catholic church, begun ca. 1820 in a location on the Singel Canal, formerly occupied by the West-Indisch Binnenhuis. It was Neoclassical in style with three aisles. Architect Theo Molkenboer added a transept in 1853. On December 31, 1933 the church was closed and sold to the Dutch Society of Life. The church was demolished in 1939. The Municipal University now occupies the site.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In 1614 the States General commissioned Hendrik de Keyser to design a funerary monument for William the Silent, Prince of Orange for the Nieuwe Kerk in Delft (in situ). Completed in 1621, this is de Keyser’s best-known work and also the most important piece of sculpture of his period. The terracotta model (Amsterdam, Rijksmus.) was ready as early as 1614. The white marble figure on the tomb lies under a canopy of black-and-white marble, at the corners of which are four allegorical bronze …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Onze-Lieve-Vrouwe-Kerk (Church of Our Lady) or simply the Grote Kerk (Big or Great Church) was built between 1285 and 1470 (rebuilt after a fire in 1457). The 65-meter tower contains a carillon with 67 bells including one weighing 9830 kilos, making it the heaviest bell in the Netherlands. Construction of the tower began in 1339. Inside the church are Renaissance choir-stalls made between 1538 and 1542 by a group of woodcarvers from the circle of Jan Terwen. Panels on the stalls depict al…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A Protestant church in Leiden, located at the Lange Mare and the Oude Vest canal. The brick church was designed by the city architect Arentsz van ‘sGravesande in 1639-1649. It is an early example of an octagonal domed church. The main entrance (in stone) was designed by Jacob van Campen in 1659.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Nieuwe Kerk

    The town council was a constantly active patron. During 1649-1656 the large, centralized Protestant Nieuwe Kerk was built by the city architect, Pieter Arensz. Noorwits, and Bartholomeus Cornelisz. van Bassen as part of a project to modernize an overcrowded industrial and harbour area. The ground-plan of the freestanding church consists of a rectangle with two apses against each of the long sides and one against each short side, thus creating a “preaching” church with a…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01