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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Rievaulx Abbey is a former Cistercian abbey located in the village of Rievaulx, near Helmsley in North Yorkshire, England. Rievaulx was founded in 1132 by Walter Espec, a powerful northern baron and landowner, with monks from Clairvaux in eastern France. The Abbey began to decline in the late 13th century. By 1380 only fifteen monks and three lay brothers are mentioned. It was once one of the wealthiest abbeys in England and was dissolved by Henry VIII of England in 1538. In 1758 the still-ex…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The late 12th-century refectory measured 37.8 by 11.9 m and was one of the largest of its type in England. The interior was decorated by blind arcades alternating with 21 large lancet windows, which poured light on the monks as they assembled for their daily meal. Access from the cloister was through a trefoil-headed doorway flanked by blind arcading and fronted by lead-lined troughs, in which the monks washed their hands before meals.

    Rievaulx Abbey is a former Cistercian abbey located in t…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The tomb of Thomas Beauchamp stands in front of the high altar; the tiny figures around its base give a fine depiction of Fourteenth century English fashion.

    Founded by Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick in 1123. The only surviving part of the Norman church which de Beaumont had built is the crypt. Extensively rebuilt in the 14th century by a later Earl of Warwick, Thomas de Beauchamp (later pronounced Beecham) in the Perpendicular Gothic style. His descendants built what is officially c…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The monument with the cage arch is for Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick, to the left against the wall is the tomb of Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester. The smaller effigy tomb on the right is Ambrose Dudley, 3rd Earl of Warwick.

    Founded by Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick in 1123. The only surviving part of the Norman church which de Beaumont had built is the crypt. Extensively rebuilt in the 14th century by a later Earl of Warwick, Thomas de Beauchamp (later pronounced Be…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    From ca. 1200 until its dissolution in 1539 St. Mary’s Abbey was the richest monastic house in the north of England. This is attested by the remains of its 13th-, 14th- and 15th-century buildings (now in ruins). The church chancel is Romanesque, but had the most important extant Early Gothic sculpture in England (now in York Museum). The eastern arm of the church (begun 1270) was a nine-bay aisled rectangle of a locally well-established type. Other buildings include a chapter house and th…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The eastern transept of the abbey church, completed ca. 1247.

    Fountains Abbey was founded in 1132 following a dispute at St. Mary’s Abbey in York. Thirteen exiled Benedictine monks were supplied with a site in the valley of the River Skell and joined the Cistercian order in 1135. The land was well watered, both by the River Skell and by six springs, hence the name St. Mary of the Springs, latinized to ‘de Fontibus’. Along with Rievaulx, it was the most important Cistercian abbey …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Reflects a mix of styles in vogue simultaneously. First, boldly modelled capitals and bases in a richly articulated style are seen on the tower, built by an Abingdon mason in the 1270s. At St. Mary’s, always a parish church of which the most influential parishioner was the university, Bishop Cobham of Worcester (reigned 1317-1327) paid for an austerely plain two-storey wing, known as the Congregation House, to be added east of the tower. The upper floor served as a university library. Bel…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Built by a local master builder, Jose Bolanos [also listed as Bolanos Jimenez]. The Baroque marble belfries are flat extensions of the facade instead of full towers. The church was begun six years after the Carmelite Order arrived in Cadiz.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Stone walls alternate with whitewashed (oyster shell stucco) areas with openings that divide the facade into two levels. The lower level is lined with windows topped by semicircular pediments, and the upper level has balconies and garlands. Above the entrance door is a niche with St. Joseph carved in stone by Cosme Velazquez. The main dome and the cupolas of the twin towers are covered by blue tiles.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Juliaca is a major transit and trade point in the Puno region. The Iglesia Santa Catalina was built by the Jesuits. It is built of the local white volcanic tufa (sillar); its popular name is the “white church” (Iglesia blanca de Juliaca). Today it is under the Franciscan order. The style is called “indigenous Baroque,” built by local workers.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The church and attached hospital served as a hospital from 1516-1816. From 1816-1961 it served as a maternity hospital and foundling home. In 1980 it was taken over by the city for exhibitions and the tourism office, as it sits opposite the Great Mosque (where Hernan Ruiz I also worked on the interior alterations). The core of the historic building are the cloisters of Moorish influence and the chapel of flamboyant Gothic style rich in Plateresque decoration, the work of Hernan Ruiz I, who al…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Church construction and economy in general rebounded in the reign of Alexander III (1881-1894). In thirteen and a half years, the properties of the Russian Orthodox church increased by more than 5,000 places of worship; in 1891 the list expanded with Siberian towns along the emerging Trans-Siberian Railway. Large Neo-Byzantine (the officially endorsed style) cathedrals erected in Russia followed either the single-dome or the five-dome plan. Restoration of historical churches so far has a mixe…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01