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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The main construction began in 1746 under the direction of the Infante Dom Pedro of Braganza (1717-1786), uncle and subsequently king-consort (as Peter III) to Mary I. It became the official royal residence from 10 November 1794 until 27 November 1807, when the Napoleonic invasion forced the royal family to depart for exile in Brazil. The new central east wing (1746-1758) and the chapel (1750-1752) were designed by Mateus Vicente de Oliveira. The main façade of this wing was turned inwards to…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The main construction began in 1746 under the direction of the Infante Dom Pedro of Braganza (1717-1786), uncle and subsequently king-consort (as Peter III) to Mary I. It became the official royal residence from 10 November 1794 until 27 November 1807, when the Napoleonic invasion forced the royal family to depart for exile in Brazil. The new central east wing (1746-1758) and the chapel (1750-1752) were designed by Mateus Vicente de Oliveira. The main façade of this wing was turned inwards to…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The palaces of the Alhambra and Generalife form the most important architectural ensemble to survive from the Nasrid period (1232–1492). The walled Alhambra city which sits on a steep hill, comprised the Alcazaba (alqaṣaba: ‘fortress’), palaces, mansions, two mosques, baths (ḥammams), an industrial zone with tanneries, a mint, kilns, workshops, and some adjacent royal estates such as the Generalife. The Generalife was built on ascending terraces. The sovereign reached the Generalife&#…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The palaces of the Alhambra and Generalife form the most important architectural ensemble to survive from the Nasrid period (1232–1492). The walled Alhambra city which sits on a steep hill, comprised the Alcazaba (alqaṣaba: ‘fortress’), palaces, mansions, two mosques, baths (ḥammams), an industrial zone with tanneries, a mint, kilns, workshops, and some adjacent royal estates such as the Generalife. The Generalife was built on ascending terraces. The sovereign reached the Generalife&#…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Spanish palace that stands beside the rivers Tagus and Jarama in the province of Madrid. It was intended as a spring and summer residence for the royal family and is renowned for its gardens and fountains. The old palace was extensively enlarged by Philip II. The chapel was designed by Juan Bautista de Toledo and completed by Jerónimo Gili and Juan de Herrera. It was built in a combination of white stone from Colmenar de Oreja and brick, giving a two-toned effect that was adopted for the rest…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Roman bronze pinecone sculpture is visible in the center

    The main adjunct to the Vatican Palace designed by Bramante is the colossal extension known as the Cortile del Belvedere, on which work began in the spring of 1505. The design was modified by Pirro Ligorio before its completion (ca. 1565) and altered by Domenico Fontana (1587-1588). At the time of its construction, the Belvedere was the largest building built in Rome since the Ancient Romans. It now houses various Vatican museums. …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The 1st century Roman bronze Pigna (“pinecone”) in front of the exedra (“niccione”), gives the name Cortile della Pigna to the highest terrace; it was an ancient fountain moved to the site in the 15th century.

    The main adjunct to the Vatican Palace designed by Bramante is the colossal extension known as the Cortile del Belvedere, on which work began in the spring of 1505. The design was modified by Pirro Ligorio before its completion (ca. 1565) and altered by Domenico Fon…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Palazzo Barberini, begun in December 1628, was the last and most complex of Maderno’s palace designs, although it was largely executed by others. The basic idea for this palace, with two separate wings in an H-plan, was conceived by its owner, Taddeo Barberini, nephew of Pope Urban VIII. Although many others contributed to the design, Maderno was in charge of design development. Here again can be seen his characteristic planning of eminently functional suites, closed axes (most notabl…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The palace was erected in 1565. In the 19th century it was internally modernised and externally enriched in Venetian Gothic style, with rich window framing, by a series of grand owners. The first neo-Gothic improvements were made after 1840, when the young Archduke Frederick Ferdinand of Austria (1821-1847) reassembled the property, the Palazzo Cavalli-Gussoni, which had become divided among heirs, and embarked on a complex project intended to give a more prominent Habsburg presence along the…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Hadrian’s villa was a complex of over 30 buildings, covering an area of at least 1 square kilometre (ca. 250 acres) of which much is still unexcavated. The villa was the greatest Roman example of an Alexandrian garden, recreating a sacred landscape. The complex included palaces, several thermae, theatre, temples, libraries, state rooms and quarters for courtiers, praetorians and slaves. There were pools and an artificial canal (119 x 18 m), built in imitation of the one that linked Alexan…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Town and château in France, 20 km south-west of Paris. A hunting-lodge built for King Louis XIII in 1623 was rebuilt with extensive gardens from 1631. Under King Louis XIV it became the main royal residence and the seat of the French government from 1682. The château was enlarged in two main phases, first by Louis Le Vau from 1668, then, from 1678, by Jules Hardouin Mansart. The interior decorations were carried out under the supervision of the Premier Peintre du Roi, Charles Le Brun. Versail…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Parterre d'Eau, (water garden) with the bronze allegorical statues of the rivers of France.

    Le Vau proposed in 1668 a plan which preserved the original château at the centre, surrounding it by an ‘enveloppe’, which entirely screened it from the garden side but left it visible from the courtyard. The new building was in white ashlar. The palace interiors were fitted up in the 1670s while building works continued: the apartments of the King and Queen were decorated in marbles of va…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01