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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The central facade is the propylaeum from Roman times, which had been repurposed in the Christian church, and finally in the mosque.

    The Great Mosque of Damascus constructed by the Umayyad caliph al-Walid I (reigned 705-715), is a seminal monument of Islamic architecture. The site chosen was the holiest in the city, having successively held temples to the Syrian storm-god Hadad and Jupiter Damascenus and the church of John the Baptist (the mosque still contains a shrine to John the Baptist)….

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Ottoman Turks under Sultan Selim I captured Damascus in 1516 and remained in power for 400 years. The Tekkiye complex is located on the banks of the Barada River and is composed of a large mosque on the southwest side of a courtyard, flanked by a single line of arcaded cells, and a soup kitchen across the courtyard to the northwest, flanked by hospice buildings. Takiyya is Arabic for ‘hospice.’ It was built on the orders of Suleiman the Magnificent and designed by the architect Mi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The mosque holds a shrine which today may still contain the head of John the Baptist, honored as a prophet by both Christians and Muslims alike.

    The Great Mosque of Damascus constructed by the Umayyad caliph al-Walid I (reigned 705-715), is a seminal monument of Islamic architecture. The site chosen was the holiest in the city, having successively held temples to the Syrian storm-god Hadad and Jupiter Damascenus and the church of John the Baptist (the mosque still contains a shrine to John t…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Mausoleum of Saladin holds the grave of the medieval Ayyubid sultan, Saladin (Ṣalāḥ ad-Dīn Yūsuf ibn Ayyūb, ca. 1138-March 4, 1193). The mausoleum was built in 1196, three years after the death of Saladin by his son, Al-Adil I. It was once part of the al-Aziziyah madrasa, but nothing remains of the school. Seven centuries later (1898), Emperor Wilhelm II of Germany donated a new marble sarcophagus to the mausoleum. Saladin was, however, not placed in it. Instead the mausoleum, which is op…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Ottoman Turks under Sultan Selim I captured Damascus in 1516 and remained in power for 400 years. The Tekkiye complex is located on the banks of the Barada River and is composed of a large mosque on the southwest side of a courtyard, flanked by a single line of arcaded cells, and a soup kitchen across the courtyard to the northwest, flanked by hospice buildings. Takiyya is Arabic for ‘hospice.’ It was built on the orders of Suleiman the Magnificent and designed by the architect Mi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In Paul’s time, the city of Damascus was surrounded by a wall pierced by seven gates. Bab Kisan is the gate on the southeastern side of Damascus and was dedicated to Saturn. It seems reasonable that the Bab Kisan was the gate through which Paul escaped. This southeastern district of the city was not only very close to the start of the Roman road that St. Paul would have taken, but was also the part where, from the earliest times, the Christians used to live. Early Christian tradition iden…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Great Mosque of Damascus constructed by the Umayyad caliph al-Walid I (reigned 705-715), is a seminal monument of Islamic architecture. The site chosen was the holiest in the city, having successively held temples to the Syrian storm-god Hadad and Jupiter Damascenus and the church of John the Baptist (the mosque still contains a shrine to John the Baptist). The prayer hall used the existing propylaeum and is laid out internally on an east-west axis like a Christian basilica.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Bosra became a Christian bishopric early in the 4th century (and through the Late Byzantine period) and ruins of two early churches can still be seen today. It was captured by the Muslim Arabs in AD 635. About 30 meters to the north of the cathedral is a 3rd or 4th century basilica whose walls are intact up to roof level. This is the site of the famous encounter between Bahira and Muhammad. Bahira (known as Sergius the Monk in the Latin West) was a Nestorian (or Arian) Christian monk who is s…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    After being annexed by the emperor Trajan in AD 106 Bosra (ancient Bostra) became the capital city of the Roman province of Arabia; most of its ancient remains date from this period. The Roman decumanus (main road), which runs from east to west is lined by Roman buildings from the 2nd century AD, including gateways to the west and east, a tetrapylon, and a monumental triumphal arch.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Bosra became a Christian bishopric early in the 4th century (and through the Late Byzantine period) and ruins of two early churches can still be seen today. Outside of the Nabatean gate on the left are the ruins of the Sts. Sergius, Bacchus and Leontus Cathedral, built in 512. It was the first domed building to be built on a square ground plan. The cathedral is said to have been part of Emperor Justianian’s inspiration for the Hagia Sophia.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01