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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The southern edge of the whole hill was the palace (2nd century CE) of the Roman governor of Africa. In the later 1st and 2nd centuries CE a ring of public buildings was built around the earlier colony. These included the Antonine Baths, an amphitheatre, theatre, odeion and several groups of public cisterns.

    Carthage is a famed ancient city on the Gulf of Tunis; center of a powerful state that conquered Sardinia, Malta, and Balearic Islands in the 6th century BCE. After battling Rome in the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The southern edge of the whole hill was the palace (2nd century CE) of the Roman governor of Africa. In the later 1st and 2nd centuries CE a ring of public buildings was built around the earlier colony. These included the Antonine Baths, an amphitheatre, theatre, odeion and several groups of public cisterns.

    Carthage is a famed ancient city on the Gulf of Tunis; center of a powerful state that conquered Sardinia, Malta, and Balearic Islands in the 6th century BCE. After battling Rome in the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Dougga reached the height of its territorial expansion under the Antonines and Severans (AD 138-235), when it covered more than 25 ha; its population seems to have been between 5000 and 10,000. The town profited a great deal from local benefactors; for example, P. Marcius Quadratus had the theatre built between AD 168 and 169. The theatre was built into the hillside at the top of the city slope and could seat over 3000 spectators. The theatre is still used for performances of classic theatre,…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    An amphitheatre was part of the public building campaign in the 2nd century CE by the Roman governor of Africa. Unfortunately only the heavily robbed foundations of these important buildings survive.

    Carthage is a famed ancient city on the Gulf of Tunis; center of a powerful state that conquered Sardinia, Malta, and Balearic Islands in the 6th century BCE. After battling Rome in the 100-year Punic Wars was ruined by Rome in 146 BCE, but rebuilt as a Roman city (under Augustus, beginning 29 B…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The capitolium is a Roman temple from the 2nd century CE, principally dedicated to Rome’s protective triad: Jupiter Optimus Maximus, Juno Regina and Minerva Augusta. It has a secondary dedication to the emperors Lucius Verus and Marcus Aurelius; judging by this reference, the capitol must have been completed in 166-167 CE. Thomas d'Arcos identified the capitol as a temple of Jupiter in the 17th century. The walls, executed in opus africanum style, and the entablature of the portico we…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Several groups of public cisterns built in the 2nd century CE by the Roman governor of Africa.

    Carthage is a famed ancient city on the Gulf of Tunis; center of a powerful state that conquered Sardinia, Malta, and Balearic Islands in the 6th century BCE. After battling Rome in the 100-year Punic Wars was ruined by Rome in 146 BCE, but rebuilt as a Roman city (under Augustus, beginning 29 BCE). Later rebuilt by Vandals (under Justinian), ruined by Arabs in 698 and deserted. The first civilizat…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Built by the Islamic Hafsid rulers of Tunis who were one of four regional powers to emerge in the Maghrib after the collapse of the Almohad empire in 1212. Hafsid culture is a meeting of east and west: the many Spanish refugees in the region brought their artistic traditions with them and the Hasfids also maintained close ties with the Mamluks of Egypt. The palace was later enlarged by the Ottoman beys of Tunis. It stands in a park in the northern suburbs; it now houses the Archaeological Mus…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Sea Gate marks the transition from the old city, the medina, to the new. Just through the Sea Gate (also known as the Bab el Bahr and the Porte de France) begins the modern city, or Ville Nouvelle, transversed by the grand Avenue Habib Bourguiba (Avenue de France; often referred to by popular press and travel guides as “the Tunisian Champs-Élysées”), where the colonial-era buildings provide a clear contrast to smaller, older structures. The gate stands at the point that the Rue …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Built by the Islamic Hafsid rulers of Tunis who were one of four regional powers to emerge in the Maghrib after the collapse of the Almohad empire in 1212. Hafsid culture is a meeting of east and west: the many Spanish refugees in the region brought their artistic traditions with them and the Hasfids also maintained close ties with the Mamluks of Egypt. The palace was later enlarged by the Ottoman beys of Tunis. It stands in a park in the northern suburbs; it now houses the Archaeological Mus…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01