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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The castle was founded by William I immediately after the Norman Conquest (1066). It was strategically sited in the south-east angle of the Roman city wall, just downstream from Old London Bridge, commanding open countryside to the east, the Thames and the bridge to the south, and the city to the north and west. By the end of the 13th century the outer wall enclosed an area of about 7 ha, which is roughly the present size of the castle. The huge stone donjon, later known as the White Tower, w…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    [This image is flopped. Mansion House should be on the left of the sculpture seen from the back.] The equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington stands in front of the Exchange. Cast from the metal of guns taken from the French by Francis Chantry, 1844.

    Mansion House is a rare surviving Georgian town palace in London. It is the official residence of the Lord Mayor of London. Dance’s designs of 1735 show the influence of Colen Campbell’s Wanstead House, Essex, particularly in the gre…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Rebuilt by King Edward the Confessor probably in the late 1040s, when he apparently also began the palace. The former Benedictine, now collegiate, church contains an immense quantity of monumental sculpture from the Middle Ages onwards, as well as important medieval paintings. The anonymous life of St Edward the Confessor, written 1065-1067, gives a long description of the parts of the abbey that existed when Edward died in January 1066. The Abbey became the coronation site of Norman kings, b…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington stands in front of the Exchange. Cast from the metal of guns taken from the French by Francis Chantry, 1844.

    The Royal Exchange in the City of London was founded in 1565 by Sir Thomas Gresham to act as a centre of commerce for the city. The site was provided by the City of London Corporation and the Worshipful Company of Mercers, and is trapezoidal, flanked by the converging streets of Cornhill and Threadneedle Street. The previous buildings on…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    This is the highest Gothic nave in England at 101 feet (31 meters).

    Rebuilt by King Edward the Confessor probably in the late 1040s, when he apparently also began the palace. The former Benedictine, now collegiate, church contains an immense quantity of monumental sculpture from the Middle Ages onwards, as well as important medieval paintings. The anonymous life of St Edward the Confessor, written 1065-1067, gives a long description of the parts of the abbey that existed when Edward died in …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Mansion House is a rare surviving Georgian town palace in London. It is the official residence of the Lord Mayor of London. Dance’s designs of 1735 show the influence of Colen Campbell’s Wanstead House, Essex, particularly in the great hexastyle portico approached by a double flight of steps in two stages (now reduced to one). The internal arrangement around a courtyard (later filled in) included a ballroom lit by a clerestory and an ‘Egyptian Hall’, which took its name from a…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    This is the only surviving part of the original Palace of Westminster, dating from 1097.

    On 16 October 1834, most of the Palace was destroyed by fire. Only Westminster Hall, the Jewel Tower, the crypt of St Stephen’s Chapel and the cloisters survived. A Royal Commission was appointed to study the rebuilding of the Palace and decided that it should be rebuilt on the same site, and that its style should be either Gothic or Elizabethan. A heated public debate over the proposed styles ensued…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    York rivals Cologne Cathedral in size. The large square crossing tower (Central Tower) was rebuilt, beginning in 1407, in the Perpendicular style.

    The present church was begun with the south transept built by Archbishop Walter de Grey (1216-1255), whose tomb is in its eastern aisle. In a building campaign lasting until the 15th century, the main patrons continued to be the archbishops and senior clergy. The Minster, which measures 148 m externally and 70 m across the transept, is built of lo…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The abbey’s two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745 by Nicholas Hawksmoor, constructed from Portland stone to an early example of a Gothic Revival design. Further rebuilding and restoration occurred in the 19th century under Sir George Gilbert Scott. “In 1723, on the death of Wren, he became architect to Westminster Abbey, the west gable (1735) and towers (1734-1745) of which are his; they also are Gothic in texture and feeling rather than in detail. On this occasion the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    One of a series of castles that William I (reigned 1066-1087) established around London, Windsor occupied the nearest strong point in the Thames Valley to the west of the city. By the reign of Henry I (1100-1135) the creation of a large hunting forest, together with the proximity of London, made this a favoured royal residence as well as a fortress. It is the largest inhabited castle in the world and the oldest in continuous occupation. In 1992 a fire damaged approximately one-fifth of the ca…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    On 16 October 1834, most of the Palace was destroyed by fire. Only Westminster Hall, the Jewel Tower, the crypt of St Stephen’s Chapel and the cloisters survived. A Royal Commission was appointed to study the rebuilding of the Palace and decided that it should be rebuilt on the same site, and that its style should be either Gothic or Elizabethan. A heated public debate over the proposed styles ensued. It was decided that neo-Classical design, similar to that of the White House and Congres…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    St George’s Chapel is one of the finest examples of Gothic architecture in England. It is the spiritual home of the Order of the Garter, established in 1348 by Edward III. Within the chapel are the tombs of ten sovereigns. The organ loft was built during restoration works in the reign of King George III. The design was by Henry Emlyn and it is constructed of Coade stone (an artificial stone).

    One of a series of castles that William I (reigned 1066-1087) established around London, Windsor…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01