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  • Author(s):
    Lisa Maria Kritzinger , Thomas Krismayer , Michael Vierhauser, Rick Rabiser, Paul Grünbacher
    Abstract:

    Industrial software systems are often systems of systems (SoS) whose full behavior only emerges at runtime. The systems and their interactions thus need to be continuously monitored and checked during operation to determine compliance with requirements. Many requirements monitoring approaches have been proposed. However, only few of these come with tools that present and visualize monitoring results and details on requirements violations to end users such as industrial engineers. In this tool…

    Date Published:
    2017-10
  • Author(s):
    Thurston Miller, Kathleen Fleming
    Abstract:

    Confusion and frustration are two of the emotions often felt by undergraduates when they are expected to do library research. They do no know where to start, and are unable to select appropriate terms or sources to search. Furthermore, instructors overestimate the literature research skills of their students. In CHEM 23201, a required one semester course, we introduced a research strategy worksheet as a way to guide students on things to consider when searching the literature. We assumed that…

  • Author(s):
    Diane Parr Walker
    Abstract:

    A selective, annotated bibliography of resources on various aspects of copyright and licensing related to the study and performance of music.

    Date Published:
    2017-07
  • Author(s):
    Helen Hockx-Yu
    Abstract:

    This paper describes the effort to develop an institutional strategy for digital assets management for the University of Notre Dame, where information is currently managed within a devolved organisational structure, and archiving and preservation are often overlooked. It advocates a lifecycle approach of digital assets management and recommends a strategy with the goal to embed considerations for archiving and preservation in policies, workflows and technologies across the entire organisation…

  • Author(s):
    Thomas A. Stapleford
    Abstract:

    From 1910 - 1940, the practice of business and the practice of economics came to inform one another in novel ways, a reconfiguration that included the emergence of econometrics. The core locus for this intersection came from the rise of commercial forecasting—whether analyses of future demand, price and cost fluctuations, or financial markets—based on the analysis of statistical data. Forecasting united a suite of specific interactions with the practice of economics: business support for the …

    Date Published:
    2017-06
  • Author(s):
    Daniel J. Hicks, Thomas A. Stapleford
    Abstract:

    “Practice” has become a ubiquitous term in the history of science, and yet historians have not always reflected on its philosophical import and especially on its potential connections with ethics. In this essay, we draw on the work of the virtue ethicist Alasdair MacIntyre to develop a theory of “communal practices” and explore how such an approach can inform the history of science, including allegations about the corruption of science by wealth or power; consideration of scientific ethics or…

    Date Published:
    2016-09
  • Author(s):
    Robert Johansen, Alexander Dukalskis
    Abstract:

    Developing normative indicators to measure governments’ consent to, compliance with, and promotion of international laws prohibiting genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and other norms constituting the International Criminal Court (ICC) demonstrates that it is possible to calibrate variation in state conduct over time and to compare one state to another. The indicators make compliance more visible and amenable, both to encouragement by nongovernmental organizations and states, and …

    Date Published:
    2013
  • Author(s):
    Rick Johnson
    Abstract:

    Editor’s Summary: Scholarly research is at the forefront of innovation, especially with a breadth of new technologies that can enhance the research process. However, in a race for scholars to produce more and more new findings, documentation practices and reproduction of results may be neglected. Lack of validation through reproduction can lead to a general distrust of scholarly research and experiments, but a more generous approach to information sharing could be the answer to this issue…

    Date Published:
    2017-04-01
  • Author(s):
    Thomas A. Stapleford
    Abstract:

    Whereas union leaders in nineteenth-century America often used the phrase “a living wage” to describe appropriate compensation for skilled workers, today that phrase is typically linked to unskilled labor. I argue that the erosion of ties between skilled workers and the living wage occurred in several stages between 1900 and 1930. Having traditionally avoided quantifying the “living wage,” unions were forced to do so within arbitration hearings, especially as these proliferated during and aft…

  • Author(s):
    Thomas A. Stapleford
    Abstract:

    This essay explores the history of the 1935-1936 Study of Consumer Purchases, an extraordinary national survey of family incomes and expenditures undertaken by the federal government during the New Deal. Created and administered primarily left-leaning economists, the project was an order of magnitude larger and more complex than any previous expenditure survey and was intended to aid and justify state-led economic planning. Yet it failed to be an effective help to New Deal reformers, proving …

  • Author(s):
    Thomas A. Stapleford
    Abstract:

    Prior to the 1960s most American economists rejected hedonic techniques as a solution to the problem of quality change in price indexes. I argue that behind that judgment lay a deeper conceptual divide over how best to define and assess product quality: through expert testing or through market price differentials. Most American economists working on price indexes at the time had ties to the U.S. consumer movement, which emphasized consumer ignorance and promoted expert analysis as the only re…

  • Author(s):
    Thomas A. Stapleford
    Abstract:

    This essay examines the evolution of data-collection practices in American expenditure surveys over much of the twentieth century. Economists conducting expenditure surveys faced one fundamental concern: their success hinged upon the cooperation of interviewees (typically housewives) and the reliability of their testimony. Investigators recognized that both dependencies posed serious problems, and they struggled to devise effective solutions. I argue that over the course of the twentieth cent…