Institute for Latino Studies Student Research Briefs

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Description

Undergraduate students in Latino studies community-based research courses taught by Professors Marisel Moreno-Anderson and Karen Richman launched a Student Research Series in 2007. The launch of the publication was supported by the Institute for Latino Studies, Notre Dame’s President’s Circle, the Office of Research and the Saint Joseph Regional Medical Foundation. The briefs are intended to inform scholars, community leaders, service providers, and the public at large about local Latino settlement, contributions, and challenges in the South Bend area. Topics include arts, culture, demography, education, entrepreneurship, family, gender, health care, housing, identity, immigration, labor, language, politics, religion and youth.

Subject

Education

Citizenship and Civic Participation

Children and Youth

Family and Households

Regional Research

Gender

Immigration and Transnationalism

Labor and the Economy

Healthcare

Religion

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  • Author(s):
    Erin Jelm
    Abstract:

    Grounded in extensive literature review and primary ethnographic research in the Mexican immigrant community. Explores the role of social networks as essential sources of support and generators of social capital for Latino immigrants as they adjust to life in the United States. Whereas in U.S. “American” culture, kinship is defined as biogenetic, Latino culture is characteristically more flexible with its interpretation. “Family” includes extended relatives and even close …

    Date Published:
    2010-05-01
    Date Created:
    2010-05-01
    Resource Type
    Document
  • Author(s):
    Katharine Feeley, Erin Jelm
    Abstract:

    Looks at changing definitions of family within Latino families, including an erosion of gendered roles in Latino homes and a shift toward more traditional nuclear families separate from traditional Mexican tendencies to live among extended family members after marriage. Study is based on interviews with various immigrant couples from D.F., Mexico at La Casa de Amistad in South Bend, IN. Findings indicate a strong focus on collectivism, respeto, and confianza among married couples in the U.S. …

    Date Published:
    2009
    Date Created:
    2009-01-01
    Resource Type
    Document