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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Some of the metopes are visible and a fragment of sculpture on the pediment

    During the second half of the 5th century BC the Acropolis became the focal point of the great building programme initiated by Pericles and was adorned with a group of magnificent marble buildings in honour of Athena. This temple dedicated to Athena Parthenos (‘maiden’) was the first and by far most impressive of the new structures. Inscriptions recording its building accounts show that it was started in 447 …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    West wall of the Propylaia is visible to the right

    The final temple to be built on the Acropolis was a marble structure dedicated to Athena Nike. The bastion immediately south-west of the gateway to the Acropolis had accommodated the cult of Athena Nike since the first half of the 6th century BC. At some time, perhaps as late as the mid-5th century BC, a small naiskos (shrine) of poros limestone had been built to enclose an early base, and a new monolithic limestone altar with mouldings had …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The final temple to be built on the Acropolis was a marble structure dedicated to Athena Nike. The bastion immediately south-west of the gateway to the Acropolis had accommodated the cult of Athena Nike since the first half of the 6th century BC. At some time, perhaps as late as the mid-5th century BC, a small naiskos (shrine) of poros limestone had been built to enclose an early base, and a new monolithic limestone altar with mouldings had been erected to its east, replacing an earlier altar…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A few of the Doric columns have now been reconstructed.

    The first monumental structure was the Temple of Hera (Heraion), built at the foot of Mt Kronos. This was once considered to have been an enlargement ca. 600 BCE of an earlier small Doric building: research has shown, however, that the whole temple was completed at one time around 600 BCE. The Heraion, a narrow building with heavy proportions (18.76 x 10.00 m; 6 x 16 columns), is one of the oldest monumental temples in Greece. The lower…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Lykabettos Hill in background.

    The Hephaisteion, popularly though incorrectly known as the ‘Theseion’, remains the best preserved of all Doric temples. All the columns and the full entablature of its canonical peristyle (6 x 13 columns) survive, as do the walls of the cella up to ceiling level, though the present roof is of later date. The temple is largely of Pentelic marble and dates from the mid-5th century BC, though it may have taken a generation or more to complete. It carries …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Temple of Zeus, in the middle of the Altis, was begun ca. 470 BCE and completed in 456 BCE. This Doric peripteral temple (27.68 x 64.12 m; 6 x 13 columns) was the work of the Elian architect Libon. The largest temple in the Peloponnese, it was considered the finest expression and the ‘canon’ of the Doric order. It was constructed of local shelly limestone covered with white stucco, with only the roof, sima and lion-head waterspouts of Parian marble. Later, the frequent local earth…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Some of the 18 extant columns.

    Site at the furthest south-east point of Attica, about 70 km east of Athens, Greece. The ancient town occupied the headland of Cape Sounion, with its acropolis on a steep promontory, and its most important remains are those of the Sanctuary of Poseidon. The surviving temple dates from around 440 BCE and is one of a series of four temples built to related designs and possibly the work of a single architect. It can be interpreted as a thank-offering for the defea…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Comment says this image is flopped.

    The Hephaisteion, popularly though incorrectly known as the ‘Theseion’, remains the best preserved of all Doric temples. All the columns and the full entablature of its canonical peristyle (6 x 13 columns) survive, as do the walls of the cella up to ceiling level, though the present roof is of later date. The temple is largely of Pentelic marble and dates from the mid-5th century BC, though it may have taken a generation or more to complete. It car…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    One monument at Delphi had a particular influence on the architecture of the 4th century BCE. This was the Doric Tholos (ca. 390 BCE), built at the Marmaria, of Pentelic marble, by Theodoros of Phokaia. This was the only peripteral tholos of its time and the most ornate sacred building since the Parthenon. It had 80 sculpted metopes (40 over the 20-column peristyle and 40 over the cella wall), acroteria on top of the marble roof and 9 chryselephantine statues between 10 internal Corinthian co…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    One monument at Delphi had a particular influence on the architecture of the 4th century BCE. This was the Doric Tholos (ca. 390 BCE), built at the Marmaria, of Pentelic marble, by Theodoros of Phokaia. This was the only peripteral tholos of its time and the most ornate sacred building since the Parthenon. It had 80 sculpted metopes (40 over the 20-column peristyle and 40 over the cella wall), acroteria on top of the marble roof and 9 chryselephantine statues between 10 internal Corinthian co…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The first evidence of monumental stone architecture is a sanctuary of Apollo erected ca. 680 BCE at the centre of the city. The temple of the sanctuary had no peristyle but did have a tiled, hipped roof. Between 580 and 540 BCE it was replaced by a temple (now ruined) in the developed Doric style. The new building had pronaos, cella, treasury, or possibly adyton, opisthodomos and an exterior colonnade of 6 monolithic columns at the ends, 15 columns along each side. Architectural refinements i…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The “Stone of the Pregnant Woman” (Arabic: Hadjar el Hibla‎) or Stone of the South is a Roman monolith. Together with another ancient stone block nearby, it is among the very largest monoliths ever quarried by men. The two building blocks were intended for the close-by Roman temple complex − possibly as an addition to the so-called trilith − whose monolithic gigantism remained unparalled in antiquity and beyond.

    Greco-Roman site in Lebanon, a large and important ancient city; was i…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public