Architectural Lantern Slides of Russia (includes present-day Ukraine and Georgia)

Collection Details Full Record
Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in the Russian Empire during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include cathedrals, churches, museums, and palaces. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Regions included in this collection comprise the present-day states of Russia, Ukraine, and Georgia.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Cathedrals

Theaters

Churches

Palaces

Architecture

Spatial Coverage

Ostankino

Odessa

Moscow

Zvenigorod

Kolomenskoye

Saint Petersburg

Russia

Tsarskoe Selo

Bat'umi

Kiev

Yaroslavl

Irkutsk

Tbilisi

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In 1553-1554, at the command of Ivan IV (reigned 1533-1584), the stone church of the Trinity on the Fosse (Troitsa na Rvu) was built in Red Square to commemorate the capture of Kazan. It had seven wooden chapels. In 1555-1561, however, the new brick cathedral of the Protective Veil on the Fosse (Pokrov na Rvu), attributed to the architects Barma and Postnik, was built with eight stone chapels symmetrically arranged on a common foundation around this central part. Another chapel was built in t…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The restorer Aleksey Denisov was called upon to design a replica of extraordinary accuracy, rebuilt 1994-1997.

    Ton transformed the plan of the grandiose cruciform and domed church of Christ the Redeemer (1832-1838; destroyed 1934; rebuilt 1994-1997) in Moscow by designing a two-storey gallery on one side of the central block to house a museum. The church was built as a memorial to Russia’s victory in the Patriotic War of 1812-1814. Ton excelled at the Russo-Byzantine style; he also combi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The restorer Aleksey Denisov was called upon to design a replica of extraordinary accuracy, rebuilt 1994-1997.

    Ton transformed the plan of the grandiose cruciform and domed church of Christ the Redeemer (1832-1838; destroyed 1934; rebuilt 1994-1997) in Moscow by designing a two-storey gallery on one side of the central block to house a museum. The church was built as a memorial to Russia’s victory in the Patriotic War of 1812-1814. Ton excelled at the Russo-Byzantine style; he also combi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The restorer Aleksey Denisov was called upon to design a replica of extraordinary accuracy, rebuilt 1994-1997.

    Ton transformed the plan of the grandiose cruciform and domed church of Christ the Redeemer (1832-1838; destroyed 1934; rebuilt 1994-1997) in Moscow by designing a two-storey gallery on one side of the central block to house a museum. The church was built as a memorial to Russia’s victory in the Patriotic War of 1812-1814. Ton excelled at the Russo-Byzantine style; he also combi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    I think the image is flopped–check inscription over door.

    Commissioned by Alexander I and dedicated to Saint Isaac of Dalmatia, a patron saint of Peter the Great who had been born on the feast day of that saint. William Handyside contributed engineering, as the marshy site had to be shored up with thousands of wooden piles. The cathedral has a symbolic role linked to the idea of Russia as the ‘Third Rome’. Thus, despite the compact volume, the fact that the main façades are on the l…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The building’s most conspicuous elevation, that facing south, was given an imposing but severe stone-faced façade divided into four equal arched bays by tall pilasters rising through a traditional band of blind arcades with ornamental colonnettes.

    The Cathedral of the Dormition (Russian: Успенский Собор, Uspensky Sobor) is the mother church of Muscovite Russia. Fioravanti was known as a structural engineer and the cathedral needed to be rebuilt following an earthquake. Commissioned by Iv…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The palace is behind the cathedral; it is connected by passages to the palace apartments.

    One of the major buildings in the Cathedral Square, it served as the household church of the grand-princes, later the tsars, and it is connected by passages to the palace apartments. The first stone cathedral of the Annunciation (Blagoveshchensky) was built on this site in the late 14th century. In 1482-1483 it was pulled down to the level of the crypt, and in 1484-1489 masons from Pskov built the prese…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The walls contain fragments of murals, painted by Theodosius (1508) and others. The iconostasis includes icons of the 14th-17th centuries, including icons painted by Andrei Rublev, Feofan Grek and Prokhor.

    The Cathedral of the Dormition (Russian: Успенский Собор, Uspensky Sobor) is the mother church of Muscovite Russia. Fioravanti was known as a structural engineer and the cathedral needed to be rebuilt following an earthquake. Commissioned by Ivan III, the layout of the building was dictate…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Cathedral of the Dormition (Russian: Успенский Собор, Uspensky Sobor) is the mother church of Muscovite Russia. Fioravanti was known as a structural engineer and the cathedral needed to be rebuilt following an earthquake. Commissioned by Ivan III, the layout of the building was dictated by Russian tradition and was required to be modelled in particular on the cathedral of the Dormition (rebuilt 1185-1189) in Vladimir-Suzdal’.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    See photographs by Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (Library of Congress). http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/prok/

    Vladimir was one of the medieval capitals of Russia, and two of its cathedrals are World Heritage Sites. Vsevolod built St. Dimitry from 1194 to 1197 in the courtyard of his palace in Middle Town. It belongs to a series of churches with four piers and a single dome that was widespread in the 12th century, but the solemn splendour of its architecture and sculptural decor…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Construction of the stone kremlin [walled fortress], usually known as the Detinets, began in 1044; in the following year Prince Vladimir (reigned 1036-1052) replaced the wooden cathedral with a grandiose stone structure, the cathedral of St. Sophia. Although clearly modelled on the cathedral of St. Sophia at Kiev, Novgorod’s cathedral is more austere in appearance, lacking decorative details. Its huge cruciform mass has a north-south orientation rather than east-west and is surmounted by …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Arkhangelsk was the chief seaport of medieval Russia, until 1703. The city resisted Bolshevik rule from 1918 to 1920 and was a stronghold of the anti-Bolshevik White Army. Its historical churches were destroyed during Joseph Stalin’s rule, including the Trinity Cathedral. The outside of the church was noted for two large frescoes above the two-story apse. There was a freestanding multistage belfry (campanile), built in 1773.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01