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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The 18th century was a time of very active secular building in Berne, but the only church building of these years was the Heiliggeistkirche (1726-1729), which is an interesting example of Protestant church building during the Swiss Baroque period with stucco decoration by Joseph Anton Feuchtmayr. [Niklaus Schiltknecht is listed as the architect. The church is on a historic registry.]

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The top spire is now gone, replaced 1983-1985.

    The St. Johanns-Tor (and Thomas Tower) was built after 1356 and is a former city gate and defense tower in the ancient city walls of Basel. It is one of the three remaining gateways and a heritage site. It was formerly a part of the third mediaeval ring of fortifications that was constructed round the whole city (and incorporated new areas including the St. Johanns-Vorstadt) shortly after the great earthquake of 1356. In 1888, the Thomas Tower, …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The relief to the left is the wind Notos, who is the bearer of rain, emptying a pitcher of water.

    Andronikos of Kyrrhos was a Greek architect and astronomer. He is associated with a single building, the Tower of the Winds (Horologion) on the edge of the Roman agora in Athens, of which he was named the architect by Vitruvius (On Architecture I.vi.4). This elegant and ingenious small marble octagonal building was designed externally as a monumental sundial and weather-vane, with a representati…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Parish church and minor basilica; it is one of the Seven Pilgrim Churches of Rome. According to tradition, the basilica was consecrated around 325 to house the Passion Relics brought to Rome from the Holy Land by St. Helena of Constantinople, mother of the Roman Emperor Constantine I. At that time, the basilica floor was covered with soil from Jerusalem, thus acquiring the title “in Hierusalem.” The church is built around a room in St. Helena’s imperial palace, Palazzo Sessorian…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Palazzo del Popolo (begun 1293), later the Palazzo dei Priori , has a remarkable frescoed hall, the Sala dei Notari. In Perugia the magistratura dei Priori, “magistrature of the first citizens”, was established in 1303: the palazzo had been called the Palazzo Nuovo del Popolo (“New Palace of the People”) to that point. Two more bays and a grand entrance portal were added to the piazza façade in 1333-1337, together with the arcaded loggia, where decrees were publicly read. …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The polygonal belltower, on the right of the portal, was rebuilt in 1463-1468 with Florentine-Gothic lines, based on a design by Bernardo Rossellino.

    A church and an abbey in Perugia. The Benedictine monastery was created around 996 over the former cathedral church. Its early patron was Pietro Vincioli (died 1007), a Perugian noble, later canonized. Pope Eugenius IV ordered the transfer of the abbey to the Cassinese Congregation, a reformed Benedictine congregation in 1436. From this point, …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Currently resembling a polygonal tower, it had once two floors. The upper one was demolished when the Rocca Paolina was built. It includes interior Baroque decorations commissioned from 1607. The main altar is made of a 4th century sarcophagus found in 1609. Sant'Ercolano is a patron saint of Perugia and died there in 549.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Torre Bissara (clock tower) (1224-1446), 82 m, is one of the tallest buildings in Vicenza.

    In 1548 Palladio received his first public commission from the town of Vicenza. The reconstruction of the original loggia surrounding the medieval town hall had collapsed in 1496, and after gathering proposals for its replacement from many of the well-known architects of the time, including Jacopo Sansovino, Sebastiano Serlio, Michele Sanmicheli and Giulio Romano, the town council decided in favour…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Torrazzo of Cremona is the bell tower of the Cathedral of Cremona. At 112.7 metres (343 ft 6 in), it is the third tallest brickwork bell tower in the world, completed in 1309. It has an astronomical clock.

    Dedicated to Santa Maria Assunta (Our Lady of the Assumption). The cathedral was begun in 1107 with a plan typical of the Romanesque architecture of the Po valley and consecrated in 1190. It was radically altered in the later 12th century and the 14th to the Lombard Gothic style, with …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Side of cathedral with south porch to the left, apse and dome in center, and towers visible to the right. This external wall is largely 12th century except for the dome (18th century) and porch (added 1453).

    Palermo Cathedral fuses the Latin basilican plan with the centralized Byzantine one. The four corner towers were completed in the 14th century, and the portal of the west façade is dated 1352-1353. In 1426 Antonio Gambara constructed the south portal, with wooden doors (1432) carved by F…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Broletto is an ancient Italian word, and one meaning refers to a “place where justice is administered”, and is a term used in Northern Italy for early town halls. Sited next to the cathedral to signify the strong bond between the civil power of the City and of the Church. The expansion of the cathedral required the cutting of two arches towards the south (1477) and the closure of a porch on the same side (1514). This meant the separation of the town hall into two separate units, com…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Giangaleazzo Visconti (reigned 1378-1402) fortified the Rocca di Porta Giovia (1358-1368), thus founding the Castello di Porta Giovia (later Castello Sforzesco), which he made his official seat. Under Francesco Sforza I, in 1455, the cylindrical towers of the Castello Sforzesco were begun. The main square entrance tower is called Torre del Filarete after the architect. This was rebuilt (restored) between 1900 and 1905 as a monument to King Umberto I. The castle has gone through a series of da…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public