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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Henry IV laid out the Parterre du Tibre south of the Cour de l'Ovale and the Cour des Offices. It was so called because of the statue and fountain at its centre. Under Louis XIII, Louis Le Vau redesigned the Parterre du Tibre (1662).

    Henry IV made considerable alterations and additions to Fontainebleau. He enclosed a new courtyard (begun 1599) to the north of the Galerie François I and Cour de l'Ovale around the Jardin de la Reine (now the Jardin de Diane). The Jardin de Diane is now…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In 1661, when Louis XIV began to enlarge the château of Versailles, the surrounding grounds were in a rudimentary state. The King acquired further land (at the end of his reign the estate extended over 2473 ha, now reduced to 815 ha) and had gardens designed and laid out by André Le Nôtre which would harmonize with Le Vau’s new building. Louis paid the greatest attention to the design of the gardens, visiting them daily whenever at Versailles. The grounds still retain the general structur…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In 1661, when Louis XIV began to enlarge the château of Versailles, the surrounding grounds were in a rudimentary state. The King acquired further land (at the end of his reign the estate extended over 2473 ha, now reduced to 815 ha) and had gardens designed and laid out by André Le Nôtre which would harmonize with Le Vau’s new building. Louis paid the greatest attention to the design of the gardens, visiting them daily whenever at Versailles. The grounds still retain the general structur…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In 1661, when Louis XIV began to enlarge the château of Versailles, the surrounding grounds were in a rudimentary state. The King acquired further land (at the end of his reign the estate extended over 2473 ha, now reduced to 815 ha) and had gardens designed and laid out by André Le Nôtre which would harmonize with Le Vau’s new building. Louis paid the greatest attention to the design of the gardens, visiting them daily whenever at Versailles. The grounds still retain the general structur…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Latona Fountain by Balthazar Marsy.

    In 1661, when Louis XIV began to enlarge the château of Versailles, the surrounding grounds were in a rudimentary state. The King acquired further land (at the end of his reign the estate extended over 2473 ha, now reduced to 815 ha) and had gardens designed and laid out by André Le Nôtre which would harmonize with Le Vau’s new building. Louis paid the greatest attention to the design of the gardens, visiting them daily whenever at Versailles. The grou…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Imaged from a lantern slide used for teaching. Water cascades at the head of a vista and allee were common in French and Italian gardens of the period.

    Between 1522 and 1567 Anne de Montmorency enclosed the park, made a walled kitchen garden (potager) and created the great terrace below the chateau’s east front. Of these, only the terrace survives. When employed by the Grand Conde, to redesign the gardens at Chantilly (1663-1688), André Le Nôtre seized upon this feature as the fulcrum of…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Grande Cascade, constructed in 1664-1665 by Antoine Le Pautre has survived.

    The château was expanded by Phillipe de France, duc d'Orléans in the 17th century, and finally enlarged by Marie Antoinette in the 1780s. Napoleon I and Napoleon III also used the palace, which was a U-shaped scheme of three sections, open to the east. Destroyed by fire (with the exception of a few outbuildings and its majestic garden) in 1870, during the Franco-Prussian War. The burned-out shell stood until …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Carré des Ambassadeurs- a Venus brushing her hair, surrounded by roses and flowing water. (sculptor: Francique-Joseph Duret.)

    Having finished the Fontaines de la Concorde, Hittorff built four additional fountains in the squares on the Champs-Élysées between the Place de la Concorde and the Arc de Triomphe, which had just been finished in 1836. The lower part of each fountain is the same; a circular basin, a pedestal with seashell ornamentation; a vasque supported by dolphins and ornamented w…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The sculpture is an Eagle Defending its Prey, by Cain.

    Henry IV made considerable alterations and additions to Fontainebleau. He enclosed a new courtyard (begun 1599) to the north of the Galerie François I and Cour de l'Ovale around the Jardin de la Reine (now the Jardin de Diane). The Jardin de Diane is now named after the Fountain of Diana, the plinth of which bears bronze figures (1603) by Pierre Biard. Outside the château Henry IV created an island garden, the Jardin de l'Etang, …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    La Fontaine du Bassin du Dragon by Balthazar and Gaspard Marsy.

    In 1661, when Louis XIV began to enlarge the château of Versailles, the surrounding grounds were in a rudimentary state. The King acquired further land (at the end of his reign the estate extended over 2473 ha, now reduced to 815 ha) and had gardens designed and laid out by André Le Nôtre which would harmonize with Le Vau’s new building. Louis paid the greatest attention to the design of the gardens, visiting them daily when…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In 1661, when Louis XIV began to enlarge the château of Versailles, the surrounding grounds were in a rudimentary state. The King acquired further land (at the end of his reign the estate extended over 2473 ha, now reduced to 815 ha) and had gardens designed and laid out by André Le Nôtre which would harmonize with Le Vau’s new building. Louis paid the greatest attention to the design of the gardens, visiting them daily whenever at Versailles. The grounds still retain the general structur…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In 1661, when Louis XIV began to enlarge the château of Versailles, the surrounding grounds were in a rudimentary state. The King acquired further land (at the end of his reign the estate extended over 2473 ha, now reduced to 815 ha) and had gardens designed and laid out by André Le Nôtre which would harmonize with Le Vau’s new building. Louis paid the greatest attention to the design of the gardens, visiting them daily whenever at Versailles. The grounds still retain the general structur…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01