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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    An Iberian settlement preceded Roman Segobriga. Following the final conquest of Iberia in 19 BCE Romanization proceeded rapidly, and during Augustus’ reign the city of Segobriga became a Roman municipality. (Note that the name Segobriga refers to more than one site in Spain; it translates in Celtiberian to “victory city”.)

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The southern edge of the whole hill was the palace (2nd century CE) of the Roman governor of Africa. In the later 1st and 2nd centuries CE a ring of public buildings was built around the earlier colony. These included the Antonine Baths, an amphitheatre, theatre, odeion and several groups of public cisterns.

    Carthage is a famed ancient city on the Gulf of Tunis; center of a powerful state that conquered Sardinia, Malta, and Balearic Islands in the 6th century BCE. After battling Rome in the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The southern edge of the whole hill was the palace (2nd century CE) of the Roman governor of Africa. In the later 1st and 2nd centuries CE a ring of public buildings was built around the earlier colony. These included the Antonine Baths, an amphitheatre, theatre, odeion and several groups of public cisterns.

    Carthage is a famed ancient city on the Gulf of Tunis; center of a powerful state that conquered Sardinia, Malta, and Balearic Islands in the 6th century BCE. After battling Rome in the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Hadrian’s arch visible in middle ground and Temple of Olympian Zeus in upper left. Comment–this slide is reversed.

    Dionysiac festivals were at first performed on a flat circular area in the Agora of Athens, but were transferred about 500 BCE to the sloping southern side of the Acropolis, where a temple to Dionysus was also built with an outside altar. It formed part of the temenos of “Dionysus Eleuthereus”. An enlarged, stone-version of the theatre, which was built c. 325 BCE,…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    More elaborate carved marble seats for dignitaries are visible in the front.

    Dionysiac festivals were at first performed on a flat circular area in the Agora of Athens, but were transferred about 500 BCE to the sloping southern side of the Acropolis, where a temple to Dionysus was also built with an outside altar. It formed part of the temenos of “Dionysus Eleuthereus”. An enlarged, stone-version of the theatre, which was built c. 325 BCE, seated between 14,000 to 17,000 spectators…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Only traces of the skene and the orchestra remain. The edifice (still used today) was modified by the Romans.

    Neapolis [Syracuse] was developed with a theatre, monumental altar 198 m long, stoas, nymphaeum and sacred precincts during the city’s Hellenistic resurgence under the rule of Hieron II (reigned 275-215 BCE). The theatre is one of the largest in the Greek world (diam. 138 m) and influenced both Sicilian and Roman design.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Roman theatre was built around the end of the 1st century BC (restored 1830-1914) on the left bank of the Adige River. The cavea was built into the slope of the hill, with, above, a series of terraces leading to a temple (destroyed) on the hilltop. Through the ages it had fallen in disuse and had been built upon to provide housing. In the 18th century Andrea Monga, a wealthy Veronese, bought all the houses that in time had been built over the theatre, demolished them, and saved the monume…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The cavea is one of the largest ever built by the ancient Greeks: it has 67 rows, divided into nine sections with eight aisles

    Neapolis [Syracuse] was developed with a theatre, monumental altar 198 m long, stoas, nymphaeum and sacred precincts during the city’s Hellenistic resurgence under the rule of Hieron II (reigned 275-215 BCE). The theatre is one of the largest in the Greek world (diam. 138 m) and influenced both Sicilian and Roman design.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Near (5 km.) modern Capua. Built in the time of Augustus, restored by Hadrian and dedicated by Antoninus Pius, as the inscription over the main entrance recorded. The exterior was formed by 80 Doric arcades of four stories each, but only two arches now remain. The keystones were adorned with heads of divinities, an unusual amount of sculptural decoration. The seats are now gone. The interior is better preserved; beneath the arena are subterranean passages and extensive service quarters. It is…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Near (5 km.) modern Capua. Built in the time of Augustus, restored by Hadrian and dedicated by Antoninus Pius, as the inscription over the main entrance recorded. The exterior was formed by 80 Doric arcades of four stories each, but only two arches now remain. The keystones were adorned with heads of divinities, an unusual amount of sculptural decoration. The seats are now gone. The interior is better preserved; beneath the arena are subterranean passages and extensive service quarters. It is…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The third largest Roman amphitheater in Italy. Only the Roman Colosseum and the Capuan Amphitheater are larger. It was likely built by the same architects who previously constructed the Roman Colosseum. The name Flavian Amphitheater is primarily associated with the Roman Colosseum. It was begun under the reign of the emperor Vespasian and probably finished under the reign of his son Titus. The arena can hold up to 20,000 spectators. The interior is mostly intact and one can still see parts of…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Near (5 km.) modern Capua. Built in the time of Augustus, restored by Hadrian and dedicated by Antoninus Pius, as the inscription over the main entrance recorded. The exterior was formed by 80 Doric arcades of four stories each, but only two arches now remain. The keystones were adorned with heads of divinities, an unusual amount of sculptural decoration. The seats are now gone. The interior is better preserved; beneath the arena are subterranean passages and extensive service quarters. It is…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01