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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A covered gallery on a corner of the Piazza della Signoria in Florence, Italy, adjoining the Uffizi Gallery, consisting of wide arches open to the street. The Loggia dei Lanzi was built between 1376 and 1382 by Benci di Cione and Simone di Francesco Talenti, to house the assemblies of the people and to hold public ceremonies.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    An arch in Vicenza, built in 1596, whose design is attributed to the architect Andrea Palladio. The arch marks the beginning of one of the routes climbing to the sanctuary of St. Mary of Monte Berico (built in the early 15th century). The path, called the “Scalette”, is a series of stairs with 192 steps. That was the only point of access from the city to the sanctuary before the building of the arcades by Francesco Muttoni in the mid-18th century.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Image of the facade of the summer palace of the Dey of Algiers in Algiers, Algieria. The palace is an Ottoman era palace, completed in the 16th century.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Founded by Trajan in AD 100 as a colony for army veterans, the Colonia Marciana Traiana Thamugadi, and built by soldiers stationed at Lambaesis. Although its plan is overwhelmingly military, there is little doubt that Thamugadi was intended to be a town, not a military base. Its square shape comprises a grid of 111 blocks, each 20 sq. m; most were subdivided into properties for the individual settlers, while a good number were given over to public buildings. Following a Byzantine period, it w…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    From the time of the synod of Carthage in 256 there was a Christian community and a bishop in Thevestis. Funeral epitaphs attest to Vandal occupation in the second half of the 5th century. After the Byzantine reconquest of North Africa in 533, however, the town gained in military importance and became a marketing centre. The Christian complex that was established (ca. 400) in a pagan necropolis to the north of the town walls is the most impressive surviving example of Early Christian architec…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Stands near Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park, at the western end of Oxford Street.

    In 1828, John Nash designed the arch based on the triumphal arch of Constantine in Rome. It was originally erected on The Mall as a gateway to the new Buckingham Palace, which was rebuilt by Nash from the former Buckingham House, which at that time had an open courtyard with projecting wings. In 1851, the arch was moved to its present location during the building of the east front of the palace, which enclose…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Admiralty Arch is a large government office building in London which incorporates an archway providing road and pedestrian access between The Mall, which extends to the southwest, and Trafalgar Square to the northeast. The curving wings cleverly hide the bend into Charing Cross Road. It was designed by Sir Aston Webb, constructed by John Mowlem & Co and completed in 1912. It adjoins the Old Admiralty Building, hence the name. The building was commissioned by King Edward VII in memory of h…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    After being annexed by the emperor Trajan in AD 106 Bosra (ancient Bostra) became the capital city of the Roman province of Arabia; most of its ancient remains date from this period. The Roman decumanus (main road), which runs from east to west is lined by Roman buildings from the 2nd century AD, including gateways to the west and east, a tetrapylon, and a monumental triumphal arch.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Two lionesses flank the central column whose significance is much debated. Discovered in 1841 by Greek archaeologist Kyriakos Pittakis. The site was popularized after Heinrich Schliemann arrived in 1874.

    Site in the north-eastern Peloponnese in southern Greece, 30 km south-west of Corinth. It is renowned for its Late Bronze Age (LBA) palace, tombs and fortifications. In Homeric epic it was the capital city of Agamemnon, leader of the Greek forces at Troy, and it now gives its name to the Myc…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The opposite side of the Arch of Titus received new inscriptions after it was restored during the pontificate of Pope Pius VII by Giuseppe Valadier in 1821. The restoration was intentionally made in travertine to differentiate between the original and the restored portions.

    The classic example of the single-aperture arch is the monumental Arch of Titus in the Forum Romanum. Relief panels in the passageways depict the triumph of Titus (Triumph of Titus and Spoils of Jerusalem), and a rectangu…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The classic example of the single-aperture arch is the monumental Arch of Titus in the Forum Romanum. Relief panels in the passageways depict the triumph of Titus (Triumph of Titus and Spoils of Jerusalem), and a rectangular panel in the soffit of the arch shows his apotheosis. (The arch was built by the emperor Domitian shortly after the death of his older brother Titus.) The Arch of Titus seems to have inspired the similar but more richly decorated Arch of Trajan (AD 114) at Benevento.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Soldiers depicted looting a menorah from the Temple of Jerusalem. The menorah depicted on the Arch served as the model for the menorah used on the modern emblem of the State of Israel.

    The classic example of the single-aperture arch is the monumental Arch of Titus in the Forum Romanum. Relief panels in the passageways depict the triumph of Titus (Triumph of Titus and Spoils of Jerusalem), and a rectangular panel in the soffit of the arch shows his apotheosis. (The arch was built by the emper…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01