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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In the greatest amphitheatre (188x156 m), the Colosseum (begun ad 75), the seating was entirely supported by a complex series of annular and radial corridors on three levels, many of which contained staircases. The building’s travertine façade is 48.5 m high and contains 80 arched entrances at ground-level, flanked by Doric half-columns and numbered for ticket holders. The middle and upper tiers of arches are flanked by Ionic and Corinthian half-columns respectively, and a fourth storey h…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The arena floor, which covered the usual complex of underground chambers, was of wood and so has disappeared.

    In the greatest amphitheatre (188x156 m), the Colosseum (begun ad 75), the seating was entirely supported by a complex series of annular and radial corridors on three levels, many of which contained staircases. The building’s travertine façade is 48.5 m high and contains 80 arched entrances at ground-level, flanked by Doric half-columns and numbered for ticket holders. The middle…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Circus of Maxentius (known until the 19th century as the Circus of Caracalla) is part of a complex of buildings erected by that emperor on the Via Appia between AD 306-312. It is situated between the second and third miles of the Via Appia between the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella, which dominates the hill that rises immediately to the east of the complex. The Circus itself is the best preserved of all Roman circuses, an…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    On the other side of the city from the theatre was the other great venue for spectacles, the Amphitheatre, or Arena, which can be dated to the 3rd decade AD (restored many times since the Middle Ages). The third largest antique amphitheatre in Italy (after Rome’s Colosseum and the arena at Capua), it is surrounded by an almost intact two-tier range of superimposed arches. Four bays of the original outer perimeter wall survive. The arena floor is large (73 x 44 m) and, together with the ca…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    On the other side of the city from the theatre was the other great venue for spectacles, the Amphitheatre, or Arena, which can be dated to the 3rd decade AD (restored many times since the Middle Ages). The third largest antique amphitheatre in Italy (after Rome’s Colosseum and the arena at Capua), it is surrounded by an almost intact two-tier range of superimposed arches. Four bays of the original outer perimeter wall survive. The arena floor is large (73 x 44 m) and, together with the ca…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The arena, which probably succeeded an earlier wooden structure is slightly larger and later than the one at Nimes and by the same architect. It measures 446 x 351 ft. and could seat some 26,000 spectators. The seating is supported on two rows of sixty arches, the lower framed with Doric half columns and the upper with Corintian. The attic storey has disappeared as have most of the internal stairways and galleries, but the remaining galleries are roofed in Greek style with flat stone slabs.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Dupe of NDLS_2008

    The Arena of Nîmes is a Roman amphitheater found in the French city of Nîmes. Built around 100 A.D., it was remodeled in 1863 to serve as a bullring. The Arena of Nimes is the site of two annual bullfights, and it is also used for other public events. The building encloses an elliptical central space 133 m long by 101 m wide. It is ringed by 34 rows of seats supported by a vaulted construction. It has a capacity of 16,300 spectators and since 1989 has a movable cover and a …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Arena of Nîmes is a Roman amphitheater found in the French city of Nîmes. Built around 100 A.D., it was remodeled in 1863 to serve as a bullring. The Arena of Nimes is the site of two annual bullfights, and it is also used for other public events. The building encloses an elliptical central space 133 m long by 101 m wide. It is ringed by 34 rows of seats supported by a vaulted construction. It has a capacity of 16,300 spectators and since 1989 has a movable cover and a heating system. The…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Situated in the Rhone valley, the ancient theatre of Orange, with its 103-m-long facade, is one of the best preserved of all the great Roman theatres, built early in the 1st Century CE. It is owned by the municipality of Orange and is the home of the summer opera festival, the Chorégies d'Orange. It is one of the best preserved of all the Roman theatres in the Roman colony of Arausio (or, more specifically, Colonia Julia Firma Secundanorum Arausio: “the Julian colony of Arausio estab…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The arena, which probably succeeded an earlier wooden structure is slightly larger and later than the one at Nimes and by the same architect. It measures 446 x 351 ft. and could seat some 26,000 spectators. The seating is supported on two rows of sixty arches, the lower framed with Doric half columns and the upper with Corintian. The attic storey has disappeared as have most of the internal stairways and galleries, but the remaining galleries are roofed in Greek style with flat stone slabs.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Arena of Nîmes is a Roman amphitheater found in the French city of Nîmes. Built around 100 A.D., it was remodeled in 1863 to serve as a bullring. The Arena of Nimes is the site of two annual bullfights, and it is also used for other public events. The building encloses an elliptical central space 133 m long by 101 m wide. It is ringed by 34 rows of seats supported by a vaulted construction. It has a capacity of 16,300 spectators and since 1989 has a movable cover and a heating system. The…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The arena, which probably succeeded an earlier wooden structure is slightly larger and later than the one at Nimes and by the same architect. It measures 446 x 351 ft. and could seat some 26,000 spectators. The seating is supported on two rows of sixty arches, the lower framed with Doric half columns and the upper with Corintian. The attic storey has disappeared as have most of the internal stairways and galleries, but the remaining galleries are roofed in Greek style with flat stone slabs.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01