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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Located at 47 Boulevard de l'Hôpital. It has four separate naves radiating from the central octagonal crossing.

    The Salpêtrière was originally a gunpowder factory (‘salt peter’ being a constituent of gunpowder). In 1669 Bruand [Bruant] succeeded Pierre Le Muet as director of works at the Hôpital de la Salpêtrière, which had been founded by Cardinal Jules Mazarin in 1656 on the outskirts of Paris to house mendicants and others. [It served as a prison for prostitutes, and a holding…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Located at 47 Boulevard de l'Hôpital. It has four separate naves radiating from the central octagonal crossing. Between the naves are four octagonal chapels.

    The Salpêtrière was originally a gunpowder factory (‘salt peter’ being a constituent of gunpowder). In 1669 Bruand [Bruant] succeeded Pierre Le Muet as director of works at the Hôpital de la Salpêtrière, which had been founded by Cardinal Jules Mazarin in 1656 on the outskirts of Paris to house mendicants and others. [It ser…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Salpêtrière was originally a gunpowder factory (‘salt peter’ being a constituent of gunpowder). In 1669 Bruand [Bruant] succeeded Pierre Le Muet as director of works at the Hôpital de la Salpêtrière, which had been founded by Cardinal Jules Mazarin in 1656 on the outskirts of Paris to house mendicants and others. [It served as a prison for prostitutes, and a holding place for the mentally disabled, criminally insane, epileptics, and the poor.] The following year Bruand began const…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Maternité de Paris, Port-Royal was the “lying-in” hospital for the poor women of Paris. The obstetrician Stéphane Tarnier pioneered use of incubators for premature infants at the Maternité at the end of the 19th century. The Port Royal abbey (Cistercian order, 1625) close to the Luxembourg Gardens, was transformed into a prison during the French Revolution (also called Prison de La Bourbe and Port-Libre). In 1814, the prison was converted into a maternity hospital, and was fully…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public