Architectural Lantern Slides of Germany

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Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in Germany during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include churches, cathedrals, houses, public buildings, synagogues, sculpture, and theaters. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include people and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Bridges

Theaters

City halls

Architecture

Churches

City walls

Cathedrals

Fountains

Synagogues

Palaces

Hotels

Spatial Coverage

Bonn

Frankfurt

Munich

Wiesbaden

Stuttgart

Rothenburg

Hildesheim

Germany

Heidelberg

Nuremberg

Trier

Cologne

Koblenz

Berlin

Aachen

Augsburg

Hamburg

Potsdam

Mainz

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The patron was King Ludwig I of Bavaria. The Ludwigskirche was a unique achievement of its time, the answer to Gärtner’s quest for a style that could develop the artistic possibilities he believed were concealed in early medieval architecture. The mature solution was a basilica with transept and a rectangular choir, the street façade dominated by tall, elegant, twin towers; the parsonage and Gärtner’s own house were connected to the entrance façade by round-arched arcades, giving a ho…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Kobolzeller Kirche was the first permanent church built outside Rothenburg’s walls (1472).

    German town in Middle Franconia, Bavaria, with a population of 12,500, lying on a plateau 100 m above the River Tauber on its right bank. It is remarkable for being preserved as a complete 16th-century town bearing little evidence of later centuries, and for its intact fortifications (12th-14th century). The town became an Imperial Free City in 1274. The town was bombed in March of 1945, destroying…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A church has existed on the site since the Frankish Empire. Around 1100 a new building was built under the provost Bruno von Lauffen, who later became Archbishop of Trier, as a three-nave Romanesque church. Gothic additions were made in the 14th and 16th centuries. After the south tower was destroyed in 1791 due to lightning and fire, it was decided to build the present, lower spires. Originally a Marian church, later consecrated (1820) as the first Protestant church building of Koblenz in th…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Column in the nave; choir stalls to the right. Coats of arms on the walls.

    The Franciscan Church is the oldest church of Rothenburg; the former monastic church is today an Evangelical-Lutheran parish church. The monastery (Franziskanerkloster) was begun 1281 and abandoned after 1548 at the Reformation. The various monastery buildings were used by the city, but eventually have been destroyed, except for the church. The stained glass windows were made by Johannes Schreiter. It has a “Lett…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    St. Peter’s was probably built at the start of the 11th century; it was first documented in 1195 as a market church or ecclesia forensis. In about 1310, the church was rebuilt as a brick Gothic hall church and was completed in approximately 1418. The bronze lion-head door handles, the oldest work of art of Hamburg, date from the foundation of the tower in 1342. Only seven years after the great fire of 1842, the Gothic church was rebuilt by architects Alexis de Chateauneuf and Hermann Fels…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Carved limewood, dated ca. 1500. The three central figures are St. Sebastian, St. Wolfgang and St. Rochus (Roche). The wings are painted with scenes of the Wolfgang legend.

    Also known as the Shepherds Church, the Late Gothic St.-Wolfgangs-Church had a double function. With its embrasures and underground casements, it was also part of the Klingentor fortifications, attached to the base of the tower. It has three carved altarpieces, all dating ca. 1500.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Cathedral of Saint Peter and the Liebfrauenkirche are part of one complex. The Liebfrauenkirche is indebted to French Gothic style.

    The cathedral founded in the early 4th century was a double cathedral, consisting of adjacent basilicas that underlie the present cathedral (north) and the 13th-century Liebfrauenkirche (south). In its present form the cathedral of St. Peter started to take shape from 1037 and continued through the 13th century. Work began on a Baroque renovation of the cath…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Dedicated to James, it is the first stop on the Camino de Santiago from Aachen Cathedral to Santiago de Compostela. The first documentation of the church is from 1215. Medieval pilgrims believed the church was founded by Charlemagne. The original building was demolished in 1885 (the stones were used for the construction of the new steeple) and replaced by the present church. For the Jakobskirche at Aachen, the tower of which is a city symbol, Wiethase returned to the “Hohenstaufen” …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The abbey church is a Romanesque basilica. It is a renowned place of pilgrimage because of the tomb of Saint Matthias the Apostle (chosen to replace Judas Iscariot), after whom the abbey is named, located here since the 12th century, and the only burial of an apostle in Germany and north of the Alps. The abbey was originally named after Saint Eucharius, first Bishop of Trier, whose tomb is in the crypt. The church has been given the status of a basilica minor. A Baroque facade was added to th…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Chapter St. Adalbert (Sankt-Adalbertstift zu Aachen) was a chapter of canons founded at Aix-la-Chapelle by the Emperor Otto III, Holy Roman Emperor, in the last years of his reign. The chapter was related to the collegiate church, dedicated to Adalbert of Prague, martyred in the year 997. In 1005, the chapter was founded and the church completed. Lands and rents were donated by Emperor Henry II (whose statue is under a porch on the church facade) in 1005 that remained the possessions of the c…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Russian Orthodox Church of Saint Elizabeth was built on the Neroberg [a hill overlooking the city] from 1847 to 1855 by Duke Adolf of Nassau on the occasion of the early death of his wife Elizabeth Mikhailovna, who died in childbirth. The architect was Philipp Hoffmann. The popular local name translates as “Greek Chapel”. The church was used by the already-existing Russian Orthodox community, mainly Russian guests, for whom Wiesbaden was a popular resort in the 19th century. Eve…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A former canonical foundation church; a three-naved basilica with gallery. Built in the earlier half of the 13th century, quire flanking towers possibly from the first fourth of the 12th century. Consecrated 13 December 1237 by Archbishop Theodoric. The church features a large (285 cm high and 248 cm wide) Triumphkreuz (Triumph of the Cross; Latin: crux triumphalis), created in 1220-1230. This is a monumental crucifix , a common furnishing of medieval churches, usually mounted between nave an…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01