Architectural Lantern Slides of Germany

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Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in Germany during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include churches, cathedrals, houses, public buildings, synagogues, sculpture, and theaters. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include people and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Bridges

Theaters

City halls

Architecture

Churches

City walls

Cathedrals

Fountains

Synagogues

Palaces

Hotels

Spatial Coverage

Bonn

Frankfurt

Munich

Wiesbaden

Stuttgart

Rothenburg

Hildesheim

Germany

Heidelberg

Nuremberg

Trier

Cologne

Koblenz

Berlin

Aachen

Augsburg

Hamburg

Potsdam

Mainz

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The two parts (gabled wings) of the Rathaus are connected by an arched passageway; the street level arch is on the left.

    The Rathaus has a gabled south façade, the left gable belonging to the 13th-century wing, the right to the Renaissance wing (1570-1578) by Leonhard Weidmann; the rusticated loggia was added in 1681. Opinions vary concerning the extent to which Weidmann’s scheme was followed, as he did not qualify as a master craftsman until 1575. The town hall, one of the finest in Fra…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Rathaus has a gabled south façade, the left gable belonging to the 13th-century wing, the right to the Renaissance wing (1570-1578) by Leonhard Weidmann; the rusticated loggia was added in 1681. Opinions vary concerning the extent to which Weidmann’s scheme was followed, as he did not qualify as a master craftsman until 1575. The town hall, one of the finest in Franconia, reconciles the traditional high gabled façade with the heavily stressed horizontals of the long side elevation, ex…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The rusticated loggia was added in 1681.

    The Rathaus has a gabled south façade, the left gable belonging to the 13th-century wing, the right to the Renaissance wing (1570-1578) by Leonhard Weidmann; the rusticated loggia was added in 1681. Opinions vary concerning the extent to which Weidmann’s scheme was followed, as he did not qualify as a master craftsman until 1575. The town hall, one of the finest in Franconia, reconciles the traditional high gabled façade with the heavily stressed …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The new Rathaus was built in a Gothic Revival style by George Joseph von Hauberisser after he had won the competition in 1866. Extensions were added to it in 1888-1893 and 1899-1908, and it was the first major Gothic Revival public building in Munich. The first stage of the Rathaus showed his predilection for Flemish and French Gothic. Located in the northern part of the Marienplatz, the main facade is placed toward the plaza, while the back side is adjacent to a small park (Marienhof). The b…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A late-Gothic 14th century patrician house, which today houses the tourist information office. The origin of the name is unknown. It might refer to a synagogue which was mentioned in a document written in 1385, as the house stands at the corner of a small street called “Judenstrasse” (Jews’ Street). In the late Middle Ages, however, the Jews of Hildesheim lived in a quarter called Lappenberg, about one kilometer away from the Market Place. There was also a painted gable of joust…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The City Hall, erected in Gothic style, is one of the oldest city halls in Germany. The construction was started in 1268 and completed in 1290, using sandstone from a local quarry which still can be seen in a forest in Hildesheim called Steinberg (Stone Mountain). Frequently remodelled over the centuries (e.g. in 1375, 1454 and 1883-1887) and heavily damaged in 1945, the City Hall was rebuilt after the war and inaugurated in 1954. One of its towers, which remained nearly undamaged during the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The old city hall was destroyed in the great fire of 1842. Although plans to replace the Rathaus were underway in 1843, it was not rebuilt until 1886-1897, when a collaborative group of architects under Martin Haller created a new building in the historicist style. It still houses its original governmental functions with the office of the First Mayor of Hamburg and the meeting rooms for Hamburg’s parliament and senate (the city’s executive).

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    On June 7, 1969, Oberlahnstein and Niederlahnstein were united into the City of Lahnstein. The Rhenish half-timbered building with its Gothic hall on the ground floor dates from the 15th Century. The ground level was once the market hall. Particularly striking is the baroque bell roof turret with the old fire bell. Inside the building the remains of Baroque painted stucco ceilings have been preserved. Today, the Old Town Hall houses the Municipal Archives.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    St. Sebastian is the oldest Catholic parish church in the city of Mannheim; it served both as the market church (Marktkirche) and as a reception court church for the use of the Palatinate Electors. It was built as a double structure with the city hall; this is now the oldest surviving building in the city. The building is characterized by the distinctive interplay between light and surfaces of white plastered red sandstone.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The 14th century city hall lies between two city squares, the Markt (market place) and the Katschhof (between city hall and cathedral). The coronation hall is on the first floor of the building. Inside are five frescoes by the Aachen artist Alfre Rethel which show legendary scenes from the life of Charlemagne, as well as Charlemagne’s signature. The construction was begun in 1330, building on the foundations of a ruined palace (the Aula Regia of the imperial palace, from the Carolingian p…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The 14th century city hall lies between two city squares, the Markt (market place) and the Katschhof (between city hall and cathedral). The coronation hall is on the first floor of the building. Inside are five frescoes by the Aachen artist Alfre Rethel which show legendary scenes from the life of Charlemagne, as well as Charlemagne’s signature. The construction was begun in 1330, building on the foundations of a ruined palace (the Aula Regia of the imperial palace, from the Carolingian p…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Cologne City Hall is the oldest city hall in Germany still in use. The Renaissance style loggia and tower were added in the 15th century. The entrance porch, the Doxal (1569-1573) by Wilhelm Vernucken is a unique copy in Germany of buildings by Sansovino and Palladio. Rebuilt after WWII.

    The Rathaus is situated near the Alter Markt on the inner side of the Roman city wall, in the heart of the medieval Jewish quarter. A town hall building is mentioned here in 1135-11399, but the Hansasaal…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01