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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The gatehouse on the north side survives from the Tudor period, flanked by polygonal turrets with mock battlements, fitted with Georgian sash windows.

    The palace was commissioned by Henry VIII, on the site of a former leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less. St. James’s Palace is one of London’s oldest palaces. It is situated in Pall Mall. Although no sovereign has resided there for almost two centuries, it has remained the official residence of the Sovereign and the Royal C…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The London Times criticized the clock when first built: “Mr Street’s new clock at the Law courts, hung out in the picturesque style of Bow Church, is surely too trivial and small.”

    The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is the building in London which houses the Court of Appeal of England and Wales and the High Court of Justice of England and Wales (Supreme Court). It was opened by Queen Victoria in December 1882. It is on The Strand, in the City of Westmi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The site of the church was first used in the 9th century by Danes, who built a church dedicated to St. Clement, patron saint of mariners. A medieval church was demolished for the current building. It is situated outside the Royal Courts of Justice on the Strand. The current building was completed in 1682 by Sir Christopher Wren and it now functions as the central church of the Royal Air Force. The steeple was added to the 115 foot tower from 1719-1720 by James Gibbs. It was bombed in WWII, an…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Eton College, often referred to simply as Eton, is a British independent (“public”) school for boys aged 13 to 18. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as “The King’s College of Our Lady of Eton besides Wyndsor”. The brick gatehouse of the east range of Schoolyard (west range of Cloister) was begun in the 1440s but finished by Lupton in 1517-1520. The clock is 18th century as are the open crowning lead cupolas above the polygonal turrets. This was an early use of br…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The abbey’s two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745 by Nicholas Hawksmoor, constructed from Portland stone to an early example of a Gothic Revival design. Further rebuilding and restoration occurred in the 19th century under Sir George Gilbert Scott. “In 1723, on the death of Wren, he became architect to Westminster Abbey, the west gable (1735) and towers (1734-1745) of which are his; they also are Gothic in texture and feeling rather than in detail. On this occasion the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    On 16 October 1834, most of the Palace was destroyed by fire. Only Westminster Hall, the Jewel Tower, the crypt of St Stephen’s Chapel and the cloisters survived. A Royal Commission was appointed to study the rebuilding of the Palace and decided that it should be rebuilt on the same site, and that its style should be either Gothic or Elizabethan. A heated public debate over the proposed styles ensued. It was decided that neo-Classical design, similar to that of the White House and Congres…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The column in front is the Westminster School Crimean War Monument, 1861 by John Birnie Philip and Sir George Gilbert Scott.

    The abbey’s two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745 by Nicholas Hawksmoor, constructed from Portland stone to an early example of a Gothic Revival design. Further rebuilding and restoration occurred in the 19th century under Sir George Gilbert Scott. “In 1723, on the death of Wren, he became architect to Westminster Abbey, the west gable (1735) and…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    From 1893 Berlage gradually succeeded in eliminating historicist forms from his buildings, coinciding with a general trend in architecture and the visual arts in Europe and the USA. Located on the Damrak, in the center of Amsterdam, the Beurs was designed as a commodity exchange. As a champion of Gesamtkunstwerk he included in this building all the visual arts, and in such a way that the work was executed entirely under his supervision in order to guarantee the concept of “Unity in Varie…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    In 1118 Saragossa was conquered by Alfonso I of Aragon (reigned 1104-1134) and repopulated with Béarnais immigrants, while the Muslims were relocated in an extramural suburb. The old cathedral, La Seo (Aragonese for “the See”), was at one point a mosque. Reconstructed from 1119, most of the surviving fabric (restored) is 14th and 15th century. Pere Johan (died 1458) was brought from Barcelona to make the predella of the main altar in 1444, and Gabriel Joly worked on the retable (152…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A chapel dedicated to Mary had existed since the early Christian era. By the time of the Aragonese conquest the shrine of the Virgin of the Pillar was an important magnet for pilgrims Indulgences for the embellishment of the shrine were sold as far afield as Germany and Greece in 1297, and most Aragonese monarchs until Philip II of Spain (1556-1598) made bequests. Damián Forment made the main retable (from 1509). The particular devotion of Charles II (reigned 1665-1700) to Nuestra Señora del …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The sculpture was moved from the west façade and reset above a flattened arch by Juan Guas, who came from Toledo in 1459, early in his career, to execute a new west portal, of which the huge wild men now flanking the doorway formed part. The façade was redesigned by Ceferino Enríquez de la Serna (1779-1786).

    Building began with the five ambulatory chapels enclosed by the semicircular wall that formed part of the city ramparts. The design draws on Burgundian sources, but it also shows a wider…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The island facing Place Bel-Air and its bridge spanning the two banks, always was a strategic point and Julius Caesar himself came to Geneva in 58 BCE and had the bridge destroyed. In the 13th century, a fortified castle was erected in order to watch for and repel the Savoyards. During the 14th century, as the era of Geneva’s fairs grew, the island became a large market. Damaged by several fires, the castle was demolished in 1677, save for its tower, which was restored in 1897.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01