Architectural Lantern Slides of Syria

Collection Details Full Record
Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in Syria during the late 19th or early 20th century. At the time, the country was part of the Ottoman Empire. Image subjects include mosques, temples, and tombs. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include persons and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Temples

Churches

Mosques

Architecture

Arches

Castles

Spatial Coverage

Syria

Damascus

Busra ash Sham

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A mosque located in Damascus, Syria.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Ottoman Turks under Sultan Selim I captured Damascus in 1516 and remained in power for 400 years. The Tekkiye complex is located on the banks of the Barada River and is composed of a large mosque on the southwest side of a courtyard, flanked by a single line of arcaded cells, and a soup kitchen across the courtyard to the northwest, flanked by hospice buildings. Takiyya is Arabic for ‘hospice.’ It was built on the orders of Suleiman the Magnificent and designed by the architect Mi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Ottoman Turks under Sultan Selim I captured Damascus in 1516 and remained in power for 400 years. The Tekkiye complex is located on the banks of the Barada River and is composed of a large mosque on the southwest side of a courtyard, flanked by a single line of arcaded cells, and a soup kitchen across the courtyard to the northwest, flanked by hospice buildings. Takiyya is Arabic for ‘hospice.’ It was built on the orders of Suleiman the Magnificent and designed by the architect Mi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The central facade is the propylaeum from Roman times, which had been repurposed in the Christian church, and finally in the mosque.

    The Great Mosque of Damascus constructed by the Umayyad caliph al-Walid I (reigned 705-715), is a seminal monument of Islamic architecture. The site chosen was the holiest in the city, having successively held temples to the Syrian storm-god Hadad and Jupiter Damascenus and the church of John the Baptist (the mosque still contains a shrine to John the Baptist)….

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The mosque holds a shrine which today may still contain the head of John the Baptist, honored as a prophet by both Christians and Muslims alike.

    The Great Mosque of Damascus constructed by the Umayyad caliph al-Walid I (reigned 705-715), is a seminal monument of Islamic architecture. The site chosen was the holiest in the city, having successively held temples to the Syrian storm-god Hadad and Jupiter Damascenus and the church of John the Baptist (the mosque still contains a shrine to John t…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Great Mosque of Damascus constructed by the Umayyad caliph al-Walid I (reigned 705-715), is a seminal monument of Islamic architecture. The site chosen was the holiest in the city, having successively held temples to the Syrian storm-god Hadad and Jupiter Damascenus and the church of John the Baptist (the mosque still contains a shrine to John the Baptist). The prayer hall used the existing propylaeum and is laid out internally on an east-west axis like a Christian basilica.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public