Architectural Lantern Slides of Egypt

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Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in Egypt under its British colonial occupation in the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include archaeological digs and archaeological sites as well as Cairo mosques. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include people and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Ruins

Mosques

Temples

Architecture

Pyramids

Spatial Coverage

Aswān

Dandarah

Abu Simbel

Al Karnak

Egypt

Cairo

Idfū

Alexandria

Abydos

Al Uqşur

Luxor

Beni Hassan

Thebes

Philae

Ṣaqqâra

Damietta Banks

Memphis

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Funeary Temple of Ramses II, erected on the west bank of the NIle River at Thebes. Walls are decorated with reliefs.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The first court is lined with eight Osiride statues of the king, with those to the west wearing the crown of the red crown of the south, while those on the east, the while crown of the north. The Osiride statues on the west hold the hek scepter in the left and and the nekhakha scepter in their right.

    Karnak was the religious centre of ancient Thebes and site of a temple complex, covering 100 ha on the east bank of the Nile. Karnak was linked inseparably with Thebes, the Egyptian empire and t…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Out of the frame, in the front and to the right is the one great column remaining from the huge kiosk of Tahraqa (Taharqa).

    The largest precinct of Karnak is that of Amun, which is surrounded by a rectangular enclosure wall, orientated to the four points of the compass. This wall, built by Nectanebo I (reigned 380-362 BCE), was 2.5 km in length, with four monumental and four secondary gates. Inside it there are the levelled remains of previous ramparts, which show that the sacred precincts h…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The largest precinct of Karnak is that of Amun, which is surrounded by a rectangular enclosure wall, orientated to the four points of the compass. This wall, built by Nectanebo I (reigned 380-362 BCE), was 2.5 km in length, with four monumental and four secondary gates. Inside it there are the levelled remains of previous ramparts, which show that the sacred precincts had been extended. The Temple of Amun was built on a mound that symbolized the first land to emerge from the primordial swamp….

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The largest precinct of Karnak is that of Amun, which is surrounded by a rectangular enclosure wall, orientated to the four points of the compass. This wall, built by Nectanebo I (reigned 380-362 BCE), was 2.5 km in length, with four monumental and four secondary gates. Inside it there are the levelled remains of previous ramparts, which show that the sacred precincts had been extended. The Temple of Amun was built on a mound that symbolized the first land to emerge from the primordial swamp….

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Egyptian site ca. 20 km south of Cairo on the west bank of the Nile. Memphis was founded at the beginning of the 1st Dynasty (ca. 2925 BCE), traditionally by King Menes or possibly by King Narmer, and served as the national capital during the Early Dynastic Period and the Old Kingdom (ca. 2925-ca. 2150 BCE). Thereafter it retained its political, economic, strategic, religious and artistic pre-eminence over three millennia, into the Roman period (30 BCE-395 CE). The major excavations of the Br…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Egyptian site ca. 20 km south of Cairo on the west bank of the Nile. Memphis was founded at the beginning of the 1st Dynasty (ca. 2925 BCE), traditionally by King Menes or possibly by King Narmer, and served as the national capital during the Early Dynastic Period and the Old Kingdom (ca. 2925-ca. 2150 BCE). Thereafter it retained its political, economic, strategic, religious and artistic pre-eminence over three millennia, into the Roman period (30 BCE-395 CE). The major excavations of the Br…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Greco-Roman Temple of Hathor is the grandest and most richly decorated of its period. The earliest dated inscriptions refer to Ptolemy XII (reigned 80-58 BCE; 55-51 BCE); its outer hypostyle hall was dedicated in November AD 34. It was built of sandstone on the conventional Egyptian plan, but only the inner apartments were completed. A remarkable feature is the use of the emblem of Hathor, the Hathor head, which also forms part of the naos-shaped sistrum, a musical instrument used in her …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Ptolemy III, Euergetes I (246-221 BCE) built the small Temple of Hathor on the island of Bigga (ancient name Senemt), one of many small islands in the Aswan area. Bigga lies to the west of Philae and was originally visible from the Kiosk of Nectanebo on Philae [kiosk now relocated to Agilqiyya]. Bigga was also the site of the Abaton, or Tomb of Osiris. The temple of Hathor was later turned into a church in the Coptic period.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    View before monument was moved in 1960’s.

    Abu Simbel is a site in Egypt, on the west bank of the Nile in Lower Nubia, 280 km south of Aswan. With the construction of the Aswan Dam in the early 1960s, the temple complex was one of a number of ancient monuments saved by being moved to a new site. Having been cut into pieces and reassembled, it now stands on the shores of Lake Nasser, 64 m higher and 180 m west of its ancient site. It was already an ancient sacred site when Ramesses II (rei…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Mammisi (or ‘birth-house’: an annexe where the annual ritual of divine birth was performed) shows the decoration of Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II, Ptolemy IX Soter II and Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos. This colonnaded structure was the site of the annual Festival of Coronation, which reenacted the divine birth of Horus and the reigning pharaoh. Around the back of the building are reliefs of Horus being suckled by Isis.

    Edfu [ancient Egyptian, Behdet or Djeba; Greek, Apollinopolis; now Id…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Edfu [ancient Egyptian, Behdet or Djeba; Greek, Apollinopolis; now Idfu] is the site of a temple dedicated to Horus begun by Ptolemy III Euergetes 237 BCE. The Temple of Horus, the most completely preserved of all Egyptian temples, dates mainly to the Ptolemaic period. Horus of Behdet was a divine metaphor for the living king who, having vanquished the enemy, ruled as the victorious winged sun-disc. It was therefore especially appropriate and expedient for the Greek rulers of the Ptolemaic pe…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public