Architectural Lantern Slides of Germany

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Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in Germany during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include churches, cathedrals, houses, public buildings, synagogues, sculpture, and theaters. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include people and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Bridges

Theaters

City halls

Architecture

Churches

City walls

Cathedrals

Fountains

Synagogues

Palaces

Hotels

Spatial Coverage

Bonn

Frankfurt

Munich

Wiesbaden

Stuttgart

Rothenburg

Hildesheim

Germany

Heidelberg

Nuremberg

Trier

Cologne

Koblenz

Berlin

Aachen

Augsburg

Hamburg

Potsdam

Mainz

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Bassai (Bassae) frieze original is in the British Museum (room 16).

    The Glyptothek was commissioned by the Crown Prince (later King) Ludwig I of Bavaria alongside other projects, such as the neighboring Königsplatz and the building which houses the State Collection of Greek and Roman Antiquities, as a monument to ancient Greece. He envisioned a “German Athens”, in which the ancient Greek culture would be remembered; he had this built in front of the gates of Munich. The layout …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Located at the tip of Deutsches Eck (“German Corner”), the name of a headland in Koblenz where the Moselle joins the Rhine River. In 1897, a monument to German Emperor William I of Germany (Kaiser Wilhelm I), mounted on a 14 meter high horse, was inaugurated by his grandson William II. The architect was Bruno Schmitz, who was responsible for a number of nationalistic German monuments and memorials. During World War II, the statue was destroyed by US artillery and taken down. In 1993…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The funerary monuments of the archbishops of Mainz, most of which stand upright against the nave piers, form an almost uninterrupted series from the 13th century to the 19th. The earliest are sarcophagus lids.

    The cathedral of the archbishops of Mainz, who were high chancellors and electors of the Holy Roman Empire, is dedicated to SS Martin and Stephan and is one of the three “imperial cathedrals” on the Rhine, the other two being Speyer and Worms. After Speyer, it is the earliest…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The City Hall, erected in Gothic style, is one of the oldest city halls in Germany. The construction was started in 1268 and completed in 1290, using sandstone from a local quarry which still can be seen in a forest in Hildesheim called Steinberg (Stone Mountain). Frequently remodelled over the centuries (e.g. in 1375, 1454 and 1883-1887) and heavily damaged in 1945, the City Hall was rebuilt after the war and inaugurated in 1954. One of its towers, which remained nearly undamaged during the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    St. Sebastian is the oldest Catholic parish church in the city of Mannheim; it served both as the market church (Marktkirche) and as a reception court church for the use of the Palatinate Electors. It was built as a double structure with the city hall; this is now the oldest surviving building in the city. The building is characterized by the distinctive interplay between light and surfaces of white plastered red sandstone.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    [Aachen is Aix-la-Chapelle in French.] Aachen Cathedral, frequently referred to as the “Imperial Cathedral” (Kaiserdom), was known as the “Royal Church of St. Mary at Aachen” during the Middle Ages. For 600 years, from 936 to 1531, the Aachen chapel (Palantine Chapel) was the church of coronation for 30 German kings and 12 queens. Dedicated to the Virgin, the chapel was nearing completion in 798, according to a letter of Alcuin. A lost inscription inside the building ascri…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The brick Gothic hall Church of St. Nicholas was built around 1242 and 100 years later, following the example of St. Peter’s Church in Lübeck, was rebuilt with a long choir. In 1877-1884 the church was refaced with a neo-Gothic facade. After the church in was heavily damaged in 1943 and 1944, during the Second World War, it was rebuilt. Reconstruction took place in 1950 by the architect Gerhard Langmaack largely in simplified modern shapes and materials, such as concrete piers and a concr…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The 14th century city hall lies between two city squares, the Markt (market place) and the Katschhof (between city hall and cathedral). The coronation hall is on the first floor of the building. Inside are five frescoes by the Aachen artist Alfre Rethel which show legendary scenes from the life of Charlemagne, as well as Charlemagne’s signature. The construction was begun in 1330, building on the foundations of a ruined palace (the Aula Regia of the imperial palace, from the Carolingian p…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public