Architectural Lantern Slides of United Kingdom

Collection Details Full Record
Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in the United Kingdom during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include castles, churches, cathedrals, colleges, prisons, public buildings, and public squares. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include persons and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

City walls

Castles

Churches

Bridges

Palaces

Abbeys

Arches

Museums

Colleges

Architecture

Spatial Coverage

Shrewsbury

Caernarfon

Kenilworth

United Kingdom

Cambridge

Oxford

London

Eton

Salisbury

Scotland

Glasgow

Windsor Castle

Ely

England

Edinburgh

York

Carlisle

Warwick

Rievaulx

Fountains Abbey

Windsor

Wollaton

Wales

Stirling

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The original columns of dark Purbeck marble, seen here, were replaced with replicas after damage in WWII. There are 9 marble effigy tombs of medieval knights in the nave.

    The church building comprises two separate sections. The original nave section, called the Round Church, and an adjoining rectangular section, built approximately half a century later, called the Chancel. It was designed to recall the holiest place in the Crusaders’ world: the circular Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Je…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The tomb of Thomas Beauchamp stands in front of the high altar; the tiny figures around its base give a fine depiction of Fourteenth century English fashion.

    Founded by Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick in 1123. The only surviving part of the Norman church which de Beaumont had built is the crypt. Extensively rebuilt in the 14th century by a later Earl of Warwick, Thomas de Beauchamp (later pronounced Beecham) in the Perpendicular Gothic style. His descendants built what is officially c…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The monument with the cage arch is for Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick, to the left against the wall is the tomb of Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester. The smaller effigy tomb on the right is Ambrose Dudley, 3rd Earl of Warwick.

    Founded by Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick in 1123. The only surviving part of the Norman church which de Beaumont had built is the crypt. Extensively rebuilt in the 14th century by a later Earl of Warwick, Thomas de Beauchamp (later pronounced Be…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    This is the highest Gothic nave in England at 101 feet (31 meters).

    Rebuilt by King Edward the Confessor probably in the late 1040s, when he apparently also began the palace. The former Benedictine, now collegiate, church contains an immense quantity of monumental sculpture from the Middle Ages onwards, as well as important medieval paintings. The anonymous life of St Edward the Confessor, written 1065-1067, gives a long description of the parts of the abbey that existed when Edward died in …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Rebuilt by King Edward the Confessor probably in the late 1040s, when he apparently also began the palace. The former Benedictine, now collegiate, church contains an immense quantity of monumental sculpture from the Middle Ages onwards, as well as important medieval paintings. The anonymous life of St Edward the Confessor, written 1065-1067, gives a long description of the parts of the abbey that existed when Edward died in January 1066. The Abbey became the coronation site of Norman kings, b…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01