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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The conical roofs are later additions (ca. 1841), destroyed in WWII. The building was restored back to the earlier Gothic phase with the top turret with crenellations.

    The church building comprises two separate sections. The original nave section, called the Round Church, and an adjoining rectangular section, built approximately half a century later, called the Chancel. It was designed to recall the holiest place in the Crusaders’ world: the circular Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerus…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The abbey’s two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745 by Nicholas Hawksmoor, constructed from Portland stone to an early example of a Gothic Revival design. Further rebuilding and restoration occurred in the 19th century under Sir George Gilbert Scott. “In 1723, on the death of Wren, he became architect to Westminster Abbey, the west gable (1735) and towers (1734-1745) of which are his; they also are Gothic in texture and feeling rather than in detail. On this occasion the …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The column in front is the Westminster School Crimean War Monument, 1861 by John Birnie Philip and Sir George Gilbert Scott.

    The abbey’s two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745 by Nicholas Hawksmoor, constructed from Portland stone to an early example of a Gothic Revival design. Further rebuilding and restoration occurred in the 19th century under Sir George Gilbert Scott. “In 1723, on the death of Wren, he became architect to Westminster Abbey, the west gable (1735) and…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The oldest of the church’s façades, the so-called Saint Joseph façade, was built in 1480 in a style very much inspired by the Flemish. The main façade is a robust Baroque tower, the upper part of which supports a spire covered with azulejos (tile). In the choir, the altarpiece is an extraordinary late Renaissance piece, created by Martínez Montañés with Baroque elements attributed to Juan de Arce. The Baroque-style Chapel of the Holy Sacrament backs onto the wall of the church. It was dec…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Under Ludovico Sforza and his wife, Beatrice d'Este, the city flourished. Ludovico surrounded himself with the finest artists, in emulation of Lorenzo de’ Medici: he brought Leonardo da Vinci to Milan, and Bramante designed S Maria presso S Satiro (from 1478), S Maria delle Grazie (from 1492) and parts of the S Ambrogio monastic complex. The prestigious project for a new eastern end (tribuna) to the church of S Maria delle Grazie, Milan, was commissioned by the Duke as a mausoleum; wo…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A titular minor basilica. It was founded at the end of the 10th century by Otto III, Holy Roman Emperor. It contains the relics of Saint Bartholomew the Apostle, and is located on Tiber Island, on the site of the former temple of Aesculapius. (There is still a hospital on the site). The church was badly damaged by a flood in 1557 and was reconstructed, with its present Baroque façade, in 1624, to designs of Orazio Torriani. In the center of the piazzetta before the church is a four-sided gugl…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The nave is frescoed with the Apotheosis of Santa Cecilia (1727) by Sebastiano Conca.

    The first church on this site was founded probably in the 3rd century, by Pope Urban I; it was devoted to the Roman martyr Cecilia. Pope Paschal I rebuilt the church in 822, and moved here the relics of St Cecilia from the catacombs of St Calixtus. Fuga’s designs for the atrium (1741) of S Cecilia in Trastevere effectively created a framing vista. Among the artifacts remaining from the 13th century edifice …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Louis Graves, Beauvaisien archaeologist, proposed to the Committee on Historical Monuments to close the church because of structural decay. It is classified an historic monument April 25, 1846. In 1892 money is finally released for repairs.

    The church of Saint-Étienne is a Romanesque-Gothic building (rebuilt after 1180-1220). It has a Romanesque nave of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries and a Gothic choir of the sixteenth century. The north transept has exterior sculpture around one of th…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Benedictine abbey church houses the relic of the Precious Blood and was listed as an historic monument in 1840. William the Conqueror moved his court to Fécamp in 1066. In 1106, after the relic had become a major pilgrimage site, the abbey was enlarged before being destroyed by lightning in 1168. A new Gothic church was then built by Father Henri de Sully and was completed in the thirteenth century. The Neoclassical facade was added by the Maurists in the 18th century. The interior has th…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Views of Loches distributed by the French company G. Massiot & Cie (actual photographer unknown). Distributed before 1912. Loches is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France. It is situated 29 miles (47 km) southeast of Tours by railway, on the left bank of the Indre River. Loches (the Roman Leucae) grew up around a monastery founded about 500 by St. Ours and belonged to the Counts of Anjou from 886 until 1205. It is noted for the Château de Loches and the Church of St…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Former Benedictine abbey (cathedral since 1966) in France, situated in the northern suburbs of Paris. The first church on the site was built in the 5th century ad, and Saint-Denis was the principal French royal monastery from the 7th century until the Revolution. Founded as the tomb and shrine of St Denis (died ca. 258 CE), evangelist and first bishop of Paris, the church became the main burial-place of the French kings and the depository for their regalia. The first half of the 12th century …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Part of the city hall is visible, it occupies what was once part of the abbey, adjoining the north side of the church (converted 1790-1800).

    The church was originally built as the abbey church of Saint Ouen for the Benedictine Order, beginning in 1318 and interrupted by the Hundred Years’ War and sacked and badly damaged during the Harelle. It was completed in the 15th century in the Flamboyant style. The central crossing is surmounted by an unusual lantern-style tower (1441) similar to …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public