Architectural Lantern Slides of Algeria

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Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in Algeria under its French colonial occupation during the late 19th or early 20th century. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Image subjects include Roman ruins and more modern palace and city architecture.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Ruins

Mosques

Architecture

Spatial Coverage

Tipaza

Timgad

Tebessa

Algeria

Guelma

Algiers

Djemila

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Lambaesis, or Lambaesa, is a Roman ruin in Algeria, 7 miles (11 km) southeast of Batna and 17 miles (27 km) west of Timgad, located next to the modern village of Tazoult. It was the camp of Roman Third Legion from 123 to 129 CE; capital of Roman province of Numidia 193-211; declined in 4th century. Commodus reigned from 180 to 192 CE. There are two triumphal arches at the site, one to Commodus, and the other to Septimius Severus.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Mosque of Suk-er-Rezel, built ca. 1690, now transformed into a cathedral, and called Notre-Dame des Sept Douleurs, the seat of the bishop in Constantine. (entry from the 1911 Edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica).

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Roman named settlement of Calama, part of the Roman province of Numidia, later became a proconsular province and bishopric of St. Possidius, the biographer of St. Augustine. Roman ruins include baths and a theater. The theater was completely rebuilt in the 20th century, supervised by Stéphane Gsell (1864-1932), and saw its first modern performance in May 1908. The baths were partially dismantled and used for fortification by the Byzantines.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The palace (Dar) of Dey Mustapha Pacha was built in 1797. The building became the first national library in Algeria and served as that until 1948.

    The palace (Dar) of Dey Mustapha Pacha was built in 1797. The building became the first national library in Algeria and served as that until 1948. The exterior is typical of Kasbah architecture with a whitewashed exterior punctuated with many small windows and wooden beams and with a patio and balustrades on the interior.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Roman named settlement of Calama, part of the Roman province of Numidia, later became a proconsular province and bishopric of St. Possidius, the biographer of St. Augustine. Roman ruins include baths and a theater. The theater was completely rebuilt in the 20th century, supervised by Stéphane Gsell (1864-1932), and saw its first modern performance in May 1908. The baths were partially dismantled and used for fortification by the Byzantines.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A colony founded by the Roman emperor Nerva in a mountainous area 80 km west of Constantine. The original inhabitants were Roman veterans, and it was later settled by families from Carthage and other African towns. It has been the site of a Christian community from the mid-3rd century CE. The ruins are designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. The city was slowly abandoned after the fall of the Roman Empire around the 5th century and 6th century. The Muslims later dominated the region but d…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A colony founded by the Roman emperor Nerva in a mountainous area 80 km west of Constantine. The original inhabitants were Roman veterans, and it was later settled by families from Carthage and other African towns. It has been the site of a Christian community from the mid-3rd century CE. The ruins are designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. The city was slowly abandoned after the fall of the Roman Empire around the 5th century and 6th century. The Muslims later dominated the region but d…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    From the time of the synod of Carthage in 256 there was a Christian community and a bishop in Thevestis. Funeral epitaphs attest to Vandal occupation in the second half of the 5th century. After the Byzantine reconquest of North Africa in 533, however, the town gained in military importance and became a marketing centre. The Christian complex that was established (ca. 400) in a pagan necropolis to the north of the town walls is the most impressive surviving example of Early Christian architec…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    From the time of the synod of Carthage in 256 there was a Christian community and a bishop in Thevestis. Funeral epitaphs attest to Vandal occupation in the second half of the 5th century. After the Byzantine reconquest of North Africa in 533, however, the town gained in military importance and became a marketing centre. The Christian complex that was established (ca. 400) in a pagan necropolis to the north of the town walls is the most impressive surviving example of Early Christian architec…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01