Architectural Lantern Slides of Germany

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Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in Germany during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include churches, cathedrals, houses, public buildings, synagogues, sculpture, and theaters. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Some images include people and fashions of the time.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Bridges

Theaters

City halls

Architecture

Churches

City walls

Cathedrals

Fountains

Synagogues

Palaces

Hotels

Spatial Coverage

Bonn

Frankfurt

Munich

Wiesbaden

Stuttgart

Rothenburg

Hildesheim

Germany

Heidelberg

Nuremberg

Trier

Cologne

Koblenz

Berlin

Aachen

Augsburg

Hamburg

Potsdam

Mainz

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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The rusticated loggia was added in 1681.

    The Rathaus has a gabled south façade, the left gable belonging to the 13th-century wing, the right to the Renaissance wing (1570-1578) by Leonhard Weidmann; the rusticated loggia was added in 1681. Opinions vary concerning the extent to which Weidmann’s scheme was followed, as he did not qualify as a master craftsman until 1575. The town hall, one of the finest in Franconia, reconciles the traditional high gabled façade with the heavily stressed …

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The new Rathaus was built in a Gothic Revival style by George Joseph von Hauberisser after he had won the competition in 1866. Extensions were added to it in 1888-1893 and 1899-1908, and it was the first major Gothic Revival public building in Munich. The first stage of the Rathaus showed his predilection for Flemish and French Gothic. Located in the northern part of the Marienplatz, the main facade is placed toward the plaza, while the back side is adjacent to a small park (Marienhof). The b…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Maximilian II (reigned 1848-1864), began to expand the areas to the east and south of Munich. Between 1852 and 1875 the neo-Gothic Maximilianstrasse was developed as a third axis by Friedrich Bürklein, who had also designed the Hauptbahnhof (1847-1849; destroyed 1945); the street ended at the Maximilianeum (1856-1874). With a façade by Gottfried Semper, this building stands high above the banks of the Isar. It was built as the home of a gifted students’ (and royal pages) foundation and it…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Heidelberg was the seat of the Electors Palatine from 1329. The castle, whose ruined buildings in the early 19th century were an important source of inspiration for the German Romantic movement, reflects Heidelberg’s greatest period of prosperity in the 16th century and the early 17th. The castle has only been partially rebuilt since its demolition in the 17th and 18th centuries. It is located 80 metres (260 ft) up the northern part of the Königstuhl hillside, and thereby dominates the vi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    St. George’s Fountain (Georgsbrunnen) which is above Herteriches Well (left) and the Jagstheimerhaus now (Marien Apotheke) face the south end of the Markplatz, or market square. The well, which is 8 meters deep, is the largest of the 40 wells in the city of Rothenburg. The decorations on the fountain date to 1608. The Jagstheimer House dates from 1488.

    German town in Middle Franconia, Bavaria, with a population of 12,500, lying on a plateau 100 m above the River Tauber on its right bank….

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Arcaded walkways run along the city walls. The open side offers views of houses, back yards, (here shown with firewood stacked against the wall) and occasional shops; the wall side has openings that the city’s defenders used. The Klingentor, the northernmost gate to the city, was built in 1395.

    German town in Middle Franconia, Bavaria, with a population of 12,500, lying on a plateau 100 m above the River Tauber on its right bank. It is remarkable for being preserved as a complete 16th-ce…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Located at the tip of Deutsches Eck (“German Corner”), the name of a headland in Koblenz where the Moselle joins the Rhine River. In 1897, a monument to German Emperor William I of Germany (Kaiser Wilhelm I), mounted on a 14 meter high horse, was inaugurated by his grandson William II. The architect was Bruno Schmitz, who was responsible for a number of nationalistic German monuments and memorials. During World War II, the statue was destroyed by US artillery and taken down. In 1993…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Alte Burg (Old Castle) was built on the foundations of a round tower dating back to the times of the Roman empire. In the late 13th century the original structure was extended by order of Archbishop Heinrich II von Finstingen. A moated castle was built which became part of the city fortifications. During the centuries that followed Alte Burg has continuously been modified and reconstructed and Renaissance and Baroque style extensions were added. The building has two towers facing the Mosel an…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Kobolzeller Kirche was the first permanent church built outside Rothenburg’s walls (1472).

    German town in Middle Franconia, Bavaria, with a population of 12,500, lying on a plateau 100 m above the River Tauber on its right bank. It is remarkable for being preserved as a complete 16th-century town bearing little evidence of later centuries, and for its intact fortifications (12th-14th century). The town became an Imperial Free City in 1274. The town was bombed in March of 1945, destroying…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Sixteenth century German domestic architecture.

    German town in Middle Franconia, Bavaria, with a population of 12,500, lying on a plateau 100 m above the River Tauber on its right bank. It is remarkable for being preserved as a complete 16th-century town bearing little evidence of later centuries, and for its intact fortifications (12th-14th century). The town became an Imperial Free City in 1274. The town was bombed in March of 1945, destroying 306 houses, six public buildings, nine watchto…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    German town in Middle Franconia, Bavaria, with a population of 12,500, lying on a plateau 100 m above the River Tauber on its right bank. It is remarkable for being preserved as a complete 16th-century town bearing little evidence of later centuries, and for its intact fortifications (12th-14th century). The town became an Imperial Free City in 1274. The town was bombed in March of 1945, destroying 306 houses, six public buildings, nine watchtowers, and over 2,000 feet (610 m) of the wall. Af…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    A church has existed on the site since the Frankish Empire. Around 1100 a new building was built under the provost Bruno von Lauffen, who later became Archbishop of Trier, as a three-nave Romanesque church. Gothic additions were made in the 14th and 16th centuries. After the south tower was destroyed in 1791 due to lightning and fire, it was decided to build the present, lower spires. Originally a Marian church, later consecrated (1820) as the first Protestant church building of Koblenz in th…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01