Architectural Lantern Slides of Russia (includes present-day Ukraine and Georgia)

Collection Details Full Record
Parent Collection
Architectural Lantern Slides

Description

Lantern slides created in the Russian Empire during the late 19th or early 20th century. Image subjects include cathedrals, churches, museums, and palaces. These lantern slides were intended for use in architectural pedagogy. Regions included in this collection comprise the present-day states of Russia, Ukraine, and Georgia.

Creator

G. Massiot & cie

Subject

Cathedrals

Theaters

Churches

Palaces

Architecture

Spatial Coverage

Ostankino

Odessa

Moscow

Zvenigorod

Kolomenskoye

Saint Petersburg

Russia

Tsarskoe Selo

Bat'umi

Kiev

Yaroslavl

Irkutsk

Tbilisi

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Collection: Architectural Lantern Slides of Russia (includes present-day Ukraine and Georgia) remove × Type of Work: Doctoral Dissertation OR Master's Thesis OR Image remove ×
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  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Upon departure of the court for St Petersburg, the wooden palace got dilapidated. On the orders of Catherine II, the palace was demolished in 1768. Fortunately a wooden model of the palace survives, and the Moscow Government has begun its full-scale reconstruction.

    Kolomenskoye is a Russian estate, situated on the River Moskva ca. 10 km south-east of central Moscow. It was a favourite country residence of the Grand Princes of Moscow and the Tsars from the time of Ivan Kalita (reigned 1328-13…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The restorer Aleksey Denisov was called upon to design a replica of extraordinary accuracy, rebuilt 1994-1997.

    Ton transformed the plan of the grandiose cruciform and domed church of Christ the Redeemer (1832-1838; destroyed 1934; rebuilt 1994-1997) in Moscow by designing a two-storey gallery on one side of the central block to house a museum. The church was built as a memorial to Russia’s victory in the Patriotic War of 1812-1814. Ton excelled at the Russo-Byzantine style; he also combi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The restorer Aleksey Denisov was called upon to design a replica of extraordinary accuracy, rebuilt 1994-1997.

    Ton transformed the plan of the grandiose cruciform and domed church of Christ the Redeemer (1832-1838; destroyed 1934; rebuilt 1994-1997) in Moscow by designing a two-storey gallery on one side of the central block to house a museum. The church was built as a memorial to Russia’s victory in the Patriotic War of 1812-1814. Ton excelled at the Russo-Byzantine style; he also combi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Alexander I of Russia nominated the Armoury as the first public museum in Moscow in 1806, but the collections were not opened to the public until 7 years later. It houses decorative arts as well as weapons (a treasury more than an armory).

    The Kremlin Armoury (Russian: Оружейная палата) is one of the oldest museums of Moscow, established in 1808 and located in the Moscow Kremlin. The Kremlin Armoury originated as the royal arsenal in 1508. Until the transfer of the court to St Petersburg, th…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The finest Muscovite gunsmiths (the Vyatkin brothers), jewellers (Gavrila Ovdokimov), and painters (Simon Ushakov) used to work here in the 16th century.

    The Kremlin Armoury (Russian: Оружейная палата) is one of the oldest museums of Moscow, established in 1808 and located in the Moscow Kremlin. The Kremlin Armoury originated as the royal arsenal in 1508. Until the transfer of the court to St Petersburg, the Armoury was in charge of producing, purchasing and storing weapons, jewelry and vari…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Aleksandrovsky Hall and Andreyevsky Hall were combined in Soviet times to be used for meetings and conferences of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR; they were lavishly restored in accordance with Thon’s designs in the 1990s.

    The Grand Kremlin Palace was formerly the tsar’s Moscow residence. Its construction involved the demolition of the previous Baroque palace on the site, designed by Rastrelli. It has a total area of about 25,000 square meters. It includes the earlier Terem Palace, ni…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    I think the image is flopped–check inscription over door.

    Commissioned by Alexander I and dedicated to Saint Isaac of Dalmatia, a patron saint of Peter the Great who had been born on the feast day of that saint. William Handyside contributed engineering, as the marshy site had to be shored up with thousands of wooden piles. The cathedral has a symbolic role linked to the idea of Russia as the ‘Third Rome’. Thus, despite the compact volume, the fact that the main façades are on the l…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    Shervud’s most famous building is the Historical Museum (engineer A. A. Semyonov) on Red Square. Its multi-turretted composition and picturesque silhouette have become a vital part of Moscow’s main square. The museum was founded in 1872 by Ivan Zabelin, Aleksey Uvarov and several other Slavophiles interested in promotion of Russian history and national self-awareness. Its interiors were intricately decorated in the Russian Revival style by such artists as Viktor Vasnetsov, Henrik Semi…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The building’s most conspicuous elevation, that facing south, was given an imposing but severe stone-faced façade divided into four equal arched bays by tall pilasters rising through a traditional band of blind arcades with ornamental colonnettes.

    The Cathedral of the Dormition (Russian: Успенский Собор, Uspensky Sobor) is the mother church of Muscovite Russia. Fioravanti was known as a structural engineer and the cathedral needed to be rebuilt following an earthquake. Commissioned by Iv…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The palace is behind the cathedral; it is connected by passages to the palace apartments.

    One of the major buildings in the Cathedral Square, it served as the household church of the grand-princes, later the tsars, and it is connected by passages to the palace apartments. The first stone cathedral of the Annunciation (Blagoveshchensky) was built on this site in the late 14th century. In 1482-1483 it was pulled down to the level of the crypt, and in 1484-1489 masons from Pskov built the prese…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The walls contain fragments of murals, painted by Theodosius (1508) and others. The iconostasis includes icons of the 14th-17th centuries, including icons painted by Andrei Rublev, Feofan Grek and Prokhor.

    The Cathedral of the Dormition (Russian: Успенский Собор, Uspensky Sobor) is the mother church of Muscovite Russia. Fioravanti was known as a structural engineer and the cathedral needed to be rebuilt following an earthquake. Commissioned by Ivan III, the layout of the building was dictate…

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public
  • Creator(s):
    G. Massiot & cie
    Description:

    The Cathedral of the Dormition (Russian: Успенский Собор, Uspensky Sobor) is the mother church of Muscovite Russia. Fioravanti was known as a structural engineer and the cathedral needed to be rebuilt following an earthquake. Commissioned by Ivan III, the layout of the building was dictated by Russian tradition and was required to be modelled in particular on the cathedral of the Dormition (rebuilt 1185-1189) in Vladimir-Suzdal’.

    Date Created:
    1910-01-01
    Record Visibility:
    Public