DIABETES-RELATED STIGMA AND ITS INFLUENCE ON SOCIAL NETWORKS, SOCIAL SUPPORT, AND HBA1C IN GHANA

Article

Abstract

Objective: We applied a social network approach to examine if three types of diabetes-related stigma (self-stigma, perceived stigma and enacted stigma) moderated associations between social network characteristics (network size, kin composition, household composition, and network density), social support, and blood glucose among Ghanaians with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: Data were obtained through a cross-sectional survey of 254 adults at a diabetes clinic in Ghana that assessed participants’ social networks, social support, and frequency of experiencing three types of diabetes-related stigma. Results: Self-stigma moderated associations between kin composition and social support when controlling for network size (beta= 1.29, P <.0001). Among study participants reporting low self-stigma, kin composition was positively associated with social support (beta=1.29, P<.0001), but this association was not found among those reporting high self-stigma. Network size was positively associated with social support among participants reporting both low and high self-stigma. None of the types of diabetes-related stigma moderated other associations between social networks, social support, and blood glucose. Conclusions: Individuals with T2DM who report high self-stigma may have lower social support, which can reduce their capacity for disease management. Additionally, larger social networks may be beneficial for individuals with T2DM in countries like Ghana, and interventions that expand network resources may facilitate diabetes control.

Attributes

Attribute NameValues
Creator
  • Appiah, Lambert T.

  • Moore, Spencer

  • Merchant, Anwar T.

  • Davis, Rachel E.

  • Botchway, Marian

Journal or Work Title
  • Ethnicity & Disease

Volume
  • 31

Issue
  • 1

First Page
  • 57

Last Page
  • 66

ISSN
  • 1049-510X

eISSN
  • 1945-0826

Subject
  • Ghana

  • Stigma

  • Family

  • Social Support

  • Type 2 Diabetes

  • Association

  • Blood Glucose

  • Health

  • Attitudes

  • Social Networks

  • Framework

  • Illness

Publisher
  • Int Soc Hypertension Blacks-Ishib

Language
  • English

Departments and Units
Record Visibility Public

Digital Object Identifier

doi:10.18865/ed.31.1.57

This DOI is the best way to cite this article.

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