Automatic Shifts of Spatial Attention to Symbolic Cues that Convey Information About Direction and Distance

Master's Thesis

Abstract

Abstract by Pedro Sztybel

Spatial symbols can direct attention to a specific location in space only when they are capable of specifying both direction and distance. Interestingly, the spatial symbols used in most previous spatial cueing studies only convey information about direction. In a recent study, we presented observers with symbolic cues that conveyed information about both the direction and the distance of an upcoming target within the context of the spatial cueing paradigm. Results showed that observers have greater expertise using direction symbols than distance symbols to guide attention. However, these findings were limited to voluntary shifts of attention. The present study sought further evidence in favor of direction expertise by examining the extent to which symbolic information about direction and distance are characterized by automatic attentional processing. As expected, results showed that direction symbols produced a larger automatic response than distance symbols. These results are important because they provide support for the direction expertise hypothesis and extend current semantic-based theories of symbolic control.

Attributes

Attribute NameValues
URN
  • etd-04072015-101206

Author Pedro Sztybel
Advisor Bradley S. Gibson
Contributor James Brockmole, Committee Member
Contributor Bradley S. Gibson, Committee Chair
Contributor Sidney DMello, Committee Member
Degree Level Master's Thesis
Degree Discipline Psychology
Degree Name MA
Defense Date
  • 2015-03-27

Submission Date 2015-04-07
Country
  • United States of America

Subject
  • Spatial Attention

  • Symbolic Control of Attention

  • Spatial Cueing

Publisher
  • University of Notre Dame

Language
  • English

Record Visibility and Access Public
Content License
  • All rights reserved

Departments and Units

Files

Please Note: You may encounter a delay before a download begins. Large or infrequently accessed files can take several minutes to retrieve from our archival storage system.