Ávila Cathedral: Exterior detail, west portal and missing tower of the facade; to the left is a mechanical clock by Guas

Image

Description

The sculpture was moved from the west façade and reset above a flattened arch by Juan Guas, who came from Toledo in 1459, early in his career, to execute a new west portal, of which the huge wild men now flanking the doorway formed part. The façade was redesigned by Ceferino Enríquez de la Serna (1779-1786).

Building began with the five ambulatory chapels enclosed by the semicircular wall that formed part of the city ramparts. The design draws on Burgundian sources, but it also shows a wider awareness of Early Gothic experiments in northern France. The double ambulatory with slender columns is derived from Saint-Denis Abbey and other Ile-de-France buildings. In the 13th century a sacristy with a complex rib vault, a chapter house with eight-part vault and squinches and a cloister were added, but construction slowed in the nave. Juan Guas was commissioned for a chapel in the cloister in 1471, and Martín de Solórzano designed the library (Capilla del Cardenal) in 1495. Other Renaissance work was done up to 1603.

Attributes

Attribute NameValues
Alternate Title
  • Catedral del Salvador, Ávila

Creator
  • G. Massiot & cie

Subject
  • Architecture

  • Cathedrals

  • Clock-towers

Date Created
  • 1910-01-01

Date Digitized
  • 2007-01-01

Cultural Context
  • Renaissance

  • Gothic (Medieval)

  • Romanesque

Place of Creation
  • Ávila

  • +40.65582-4.697245

  • Ávila, Ávila, Spain

Departments and Units
Member of
Temporal Coverage
  • before or circa 1910

Record Visibility and Access Public
Content License

Collections

Collections Featuring this Image
Architectural Lantern Slides of Spain

Files

Please Note: You may encounter a delay before a download begins. Large or infrequently accessed files can take several minutes to retrieve from our archival storage system.